Preface (to: Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces)

Brendan Z. Allison, Stephen Dunne, Robert Leeb, Jose del R. Millán

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Brain–computer interface (BCI) research is advancing rapidly. The last few years have seen a dramatic rise in journal publications, academic workshops and conferences, books, new products aimed at both healthy and disabled users, research funding from different sources, and media attention. This media attention has included both BCI fi (BCI-based science fiction) and stories in mainstream magazines and television news programs. Despite this progress and attention, most people still do not use BCIs, or even know what they are. While the authors of this book generally have access to the best BCI equipment, and they know how to use it, the chapters are written in the oldfashioned way, with keyboards and mice instead of BCIs. This may be surprising because BCIs are generally presented inaccurately in the popular media, where undeserved hype and sloppy reporting often create a gap between expectations and reality. This book aims to bridge that gap by educating readers about BCIs, with emphasis on making BCIs practical in real-world settings. Experts in BCI research widely agree that one of the major challenges in the field is moving BCIs from laboratory gadgets that work with some healthy users to tools that are reliable, straightforward, and useful in field settings for whoever needs them. Many of these experts discuss the state of the art and major challenges across four sections. Three of the sections address the three main components of BCIs: sensors, signals, and signal processing; devices and applications; and interfaces and environments. The last section summarizes other challenges that relate to complete BCI systems instead of one component.
Original languageUndefined
Title of host publicationTowards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces: Bridging the Gap from Research to Real-World Applications
EditorsBrendan Z. Allison, Stephen Dunne, Robert Leeb, Jose del R. Millán, Antinus Nijholt
Place of PublicationHeidelberg
PublisherSpringer
Pagesv-vi
Number of pages2
ISBN (Print)978-3-642-29745-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Aug 2012

Publication series

NameBiological and Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering
PublisherSpringer Verlag
ISSN (Print)1618-7210

Keywords

  • IR-81268
  • METIS-287837
  • Brain-Computer Interfacing
  • Human Factors
  • Multi-modal interaction
  • EWI-20970
  • HMI-MI: MULTIMODAL INTERACTIONS
  • HMI-IA: Intelligent Agents
  • HMI-HF: Human Factors
  • HMI-CI: Computational Intelligence
  • EC Grant Agreement nr.: FP7/248320

Cite this

Allison, B. Z., Dunne, S., Leeb, R., & Millán, J. D. R. (2012). Preface (to: Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces). In B. Z. Allison, S. Dunne, R. Leeb, J. D. R. Millán, & A. Nijholt (Eds.), Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces: Bridging the Gap from Research to Real-World Applications (pp. v-vi). (Biological and Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering). Heidelberg: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-29746-5
Allison, Brendan Z. ; Dunne, Stephen ; Leeb, Robert ; Millán, Jose del R. / Preface (to: Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces). Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces: Bridging the Gap from Research to Real-World Applications. editor / Brendan Z. Allison ; Stephen Dunne ; Robert Leeb ; Jose del R. Millán ; Antinus Nijholt. Heidelberg : Springer, 2012. pp. v-vi (Biological and Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering).
@inbook{676d546a7b734ed1913a6ca4b84fe235,
title = "Preface (to: Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces)",
abstract = "Brain–computer interface (BCI) research is advancing rapidly. The last few years have seen a dramatic rise in journal publications, academic workshops and conferences, books, new products aimed at both healthy and disabled users, research funding from different sources, and media attention. This media attention has included both BCI fi (BCI-based science fiction) and stories in mainstream magazines and television news programs. Despite this progress and attention, most people still do not use BCIs, or even know what they are. While the authors of this book generally have access to the best BCI equipment, and they know how to use it, the chapters are written in the oldfashioned way, with keyboards and mice instead of BCIs. This may be surprising because BCIs are generally presented inaccurately in the popular media, where undeserved hype and sloppy reporting often create a gap between expectations and reality. This book aims to bridge that gap by educating readers about BCIs, with emphasis on making BCIs practical in real-world settings. Experts in BCI research widely agree that one of the major challenges in the field is moving BCIs from laboratory gadgets that work with some healthy users to tools that are reliable, straightforward, and useful in field settings for whoever needs them. Many of these experts discuss the state of the art and major challenges across four sections. Three of the sections address the three main components of BCIs: sensors, signals, and signal processing; devices and applications; and interfaces and environments. The last section summarizes other challenges that relate to complete BCI systems instead of one component.",
keywords = "IR-81268, METIS-287837, Brain-Computer Interfacing, Human Factors, Multi-modal interaction, EWI-20970, HMI-MI: MULTIMODAL INTERACTIONS, HMI-IA: Intelligent Agents, HMI-HF: Human Factors, HMI-CI: Computational Intelligence, EC Grant Agreement nr.: FP7/248320",
author = "Allison, {Brendan Z.} and Stephen Dunne and Robert Leeb and Mill{\'a}n, {Jose del R.}",
note = "10.1007/978-3-642-29746-5",
year = "2012",
month = "8",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-642-29746-5",
language = "Undefined",
isbn = "978-3-642-29745-8",
series = "Biological and Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering",
publisher = "Springer",
pages = "v--vi",
editor = "Allison, {Brendan Z.} and Stephen Dunne and Robert Leeb and Mill{\'a}n, {Jose del R.} and Antinus Nijholt",
booktitle = "Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces: Bridging the Gap from Research to Real-World Applications",

}

Allison, BZ, Dunne, S, Leeb, R & Millán, JDR 2012, Preface (to: Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces). in BZ Allison, S Dunne, R Leeb, JDR Millán & A Nijholt (eds), Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces: Bridging the Gap from Research to Real-World Applications. Biological and Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Springer, Heidelberg, pp. v-vi. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-29746-5

Preface (to: Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces). / Allison, Brendan Z.; Dunne, Stephen; Leeb, Robert; Millán, Jose del R.

Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces: Bridging the Gap from Research to Real-World Applications. ed. / Brendan Z. Allison; Stephen Dunne; Robert Leeb; Jose del R. Millán; Antinus Nijholt. Heidelberg : Springer, 2012. p. v-vi (Biological and Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

TY - CHAP

T1 - Preface (to: Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces)

AU - Allison, Brendan Z.

AU - Dunne, Stephen

AU - Leeb, Robert

AU - Millán, Jose del R.

N1 - 10.1007/978-3-642-29746-5

PY - 2012/8/25

Y1 - 2012/8/25

N2 - Brain–computer interface (BCI) research is advancing rapidly. The last few years have seen a dramatic rise in journal publications, academic workshops and conferences, books, new products aimed at both healthy and disabled users, research funding from different sources, and media attention. This media attention has included both BCI fi (BCI-based science fiction) and stories in mainstream magazines and television news programs. Despite this progress and attention, most people still do not use BCIs, or even know what they are. While the authors of this book generally have access to the best BCI equipment, and they know how to use it, the chapters are written in the oldfashioned way, with keyboards and mice instead of BCIs. This may be surprising because BCIs are generally presented inaccurately in the popular media, where undeserved hype and sloppy reporting often create a gap between expectations and reality. This book aims to bridge that gap by educating readers about BCIs, with emphasis on making BCIs practical in real-world settings. Experts in BCI research widely agree that one of the major challenges in the field is moving BCIs from laboratory gadgets that work with some healthy users to tools that are reliable, straightforward, and useful in field settings for whoever needs them. Many of these experts discuss the state of the art and major challenges across four sections. Three of the sections address the three main components of BCIs: sensors, signals, and signal processing; devices and applications; and interfaces and environments. The last section summarizes other challenges that relate to complete BCI systems instead of one component.

AB - Brain–computer interface (BCI) research is advancing rapidly. The last few years have seen a dramatic rise in journal publications, academic workshops and conferences, books, new products aimed at both healthy and disabled users, research funding from different sources, and media attention. This media attention has included both BCI fi (BCI-based science fiction) and stories in mainstream magazines and television news programs. Despite this progress and attention, most people still do not use BCIs, or even know what they are. While the authors of this book generally have access to the best BCI equipment, and they know how to use it, the chapters are written in the oldfashioned way, with keyboards and mice instead of BCIs. This may be surprising because BCIs are generally presented inaccurately in the popular media, where undeserved hype and sloppy reporting often create a gap between expectations and reality. This book aims to bridge that gap by educating readers about BCIs, with emphasis on making BCIs practical in real-world settings. Experts in BCI research widely agree that one of the major challenges in the field is moving BCIs from laboratory gadgets that work with some healthy users to tools that are reliable, straightforward, and useful in field settings for whoever needs them. Many of these experts discuss the state of the art and major challenges across four sections. Three of the sections address the three main components of BCIs: sensors, signals, and signal processing; devices and applications; and interfaces and environments. The last section summarizes other challenges that relate to complete BCI systems instead of one component.

KW - IR-81268

KW - METIS-287837

KW - Brain-Computer Interfacing

KW - Human Factors

KW - Multi-modal interaction

KW - EWI-20970

KW - HMI-MI: MULTIMODAL INTERACTIONS

KW - HMI-IA: Intelligent Agents

KW - HMI-HF: Human Factors

KW - HMI-CI: Computational Intelligence

KW - EC Grant Agreement nr.: FP7/248320

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-642-29746-5

DO - 10.1007/978-3-642-29746-5

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-3-642-29745-8

T3 - Biological and Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering

SP - v-vi

BT - Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces: Bridging the Gap from Research to Real-World Applications

A2 - Allison, Brendan Z.

A2 - Dunne, Stephen

A2 - Leeb, Robert

A2 - Millán, Jose del R.

A2 - Nijholt, Antinus

PB - Springer

CY - Heidelberg

ER -

Allison BZ, Dunne S, Leeb R, Millán JDR. Preface (to: Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces). In Allison BZ, Dunne S, Leeb R, Millán JDR, Nijholt A, editors, Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces: Bridging the Gap from Research to Real-World Applications. Heidelberg: Springer. 2012. p. v-vi. (Biological and Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-29746-5