Probabilistic flood extent estimates from social media flood observations

Tom Brouwer, Dirk Eilander*, Arnejan Van Loenen, Martijn J. Booij, Kathelijne M. Wijnberg, Jan S. Verkade, Jurjen Wagemaker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)
252 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The increasing number and severity of floods, driven by phenomena such as urbanization, deforestation, subsidence and climate change, create a growing need for accurate and timely flood maps. In this paper we present and evaluate a method to create deterministic and probabilistic flood maps from Twitter messages that mention locations of flooding. A deterministic flood map created for the December 2015 flood in the city of York (UK) showed good performance (F(2) Combining double low line ĝ€0.69; a statistic ranging from 0 to 1, with 1 expressing a perfect fit with validation data). The probabilistic flood maps we created showed that, in the York case study, the uncertainty in flood extent was mainly induced by errors in the precise locations of flood observations as derived from Twitter data. Errors in the terrain elevation data or in the parameters of the applied algorithm contributed less to flood extent uncertainty. Although these maps tended to overestimate the actual probability of flooding, they gave a reasonable representation of flood extent uncertainty in the area. This study illustrates that inherently uncertain data from social media can be used to derive information about flooding.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)735-747
Number of pages13
JournalNatural hazards and earth system sciences
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 May 2017

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