Quantitative assessment of rest and action tremor and the effect of cueing in Parkinson’s disease patients treated with deep brain stimulation

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractOther research output

    Abstract

    Introduction: In Parkinson’s disease rest and action tremor may occur. High frequency deep brain stimulation in basal ganglia nuclei has proved to be effective in the suppression of tremor. In addition, rhythmic auditory cues have shown to result in improved performance of repetitive movements, possibly by suppressing action tremor. The aim of this study was to investigate if electrical stimulation has similar effects on rest and action tremor, and whether in case of action tremor, the effect of electrical stimulation is similar to or enhanced by auditory cueing.

    Methods: Three exercises were carried out by 7 Parkinson’s disease patients treated with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: 1) sitting at rest; 2) performing a hand tapping movement as fast as possible; 3) performing hand movements on the rhythm of an auditory cueing signal. Inertial sensors registered the movement of the hands during the tests. The exercises were repeated for four different stimulation settings.

    Results: Electrical stimulation may either enhance or suppress rest and/or action tremor. Power spectral density analysis shows that tremor suppression is accompanied by an increase in relative power in the low frequency band for both rest and action tremor. Most patients could (temporarily) phase lock their hand movements to the cueing signal of 1.6 Hz. Cueing signals at higher frequencies (3.2 and 4.8 Hz) could result in (n:m) phase locking of tremor as well as movement.

    Conclusion: Electrical stimulation results in a re-scaling of tremor, while auditory cueing may enhance suppression.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)S53-S54
    Number of pages2
    JournalParkinsonism & Related Disorders
    Volume18
    Issue numberSuppl. 2
    Publication statusPublished - 11 Dec 2011
    EventXIX World Congress on Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders 2011 - Shanghai, China
    Duration: 11 Dec 201114 Dec 2011
    Conference number: 19

    Fingerprint

    Deep Brain Stimulation
    Tremor
    Parkinson Disease
    Electric Stimulation
    Hand
    Basal Ganglia
    Exercise
    Subthalamic Nucleus
    Cues

    Keywords

    • METIS-285073
    • IR-79536
    • Deep Brain Stimulation
    • BSS-Electrical Neurostimulation
    • Parkinson's Disease
    • Rest tremor
    • EWI-21402
    • Action tremor

    Cite this

    @article{e1afce925d4947cca97617dedd31e935,
    title = "Quantitative assessment of rest and action tremor and the effect of cueing in Parkinson’s disease patients treated with deep brain stimulation",
    abstract = "Introduction: In Parkinson’s disease rest and action tremor may occur. High frequency deep brain stimulation in basal ganglia nuclei has proved to be effective in the suppression of tremor. In addition, rhythmic auditory cues have shown to result in improved performance of repetitive movements, possibly by suppressing action tremor. The aim of this study was to investigate if electrical stimulation has similar effects on rest and action tremor, and whether in case of action tremor, the effect of electrical stimulation is similar to or enhanced by auditory cueing.Methods: Three exercises were carried out by 7 Parkinson’s disease patients treated with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: 1) sitting at rest; 2) performing a hand tapping movement as fast as possible; 3) performing hand movements on the rhythm of an auditory cueing signal. Inertial sensors registered the movement of the hands during the tests. The exercises were repeated for four different stimulation settings. Results: Electrical stimulation may either enhance or suppress rest and/or action tremor. Power spectral density analysis shows that tremor suppression is accompanied by an increase in relative power in the low frequency band for both rest and action tremor. Most patients could (temporarily) phase lock their hand movements to the cueing signal of 1.6 Hz. Cueing signals at higher frequencies (3.2 and 4.8 Hz) could result in (n:m) phase locking of tremor as well as movement. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation results in a re-scaling of tremor, while auditory cueing may enhance suppression.",
    keywords = "METIS-285073, IR-79536, Deep Brain Stimulation, BSS-Electrical Neurostimulation, Parkinson's Disease, Rest tremor, EWI-21402, Action tremor",
    author = "Tjitske Heida and E.C. Wentink and Enrico Marani",
    year = "2011",
    month = "12",
    day = "11",
    language = "English",
    volume = "18",
    pages = "S53--S54",
    journal = "Parkinsonism & Related Disorders",
    issn = "1353-8020",
    publisher = "Elsevier",
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    Quantitative assessment of rest and action tremor and the effect of cueing in Parkinson’s disease patients treated with deep brain stimulation. / Heida, Tjitske; Wentink, E.C.; Marani, Enrico.

    In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, Vol. 18, No. Suppl. 2, 11.12.2011, p. S53-S54.

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractOther research output

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Quantitative assessment of rest and action tremor and the effect of cueing in Parkinson’s disease patients treated with deep brain stimulation

    AU - Heida, Tjitske

    AU - Wentink, E.C.

    AU - Marani, Enrico

    PY - 2011/12/11

    Y1 - 2011/12/11

    N2 - Introduction: In Parkinson’s disease rest and action tremor may occur. High frequency deep brain stimulation in basal ganglia nuclei has proved to be effective in the suppression of tremor. In addition, rhythmic auditory cues have shown to result in improved performance of repetitive movements, possibly by suppressing action tremor. The aim of this study was to investigate if electrical stimulation has similar effects on rest and action tremor, and whether in case of action tremor, the effect of electrical stimulation is similar to or enhanced by auditory cueing.Methods: Three exercises were carried out by 7 Parkinson’s disease patients treated with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: 1) sitting at rest; 2) performing a hand tapping movement as fast as possible; 3) performing hand movements on the rhythm of an auditory cueing signal. Inertial sensors registered the movement of the hands during the tests. The exercises were repeated for four different stimulation settings. Results: Electrical stimulation may either enhance or suppress rest and/or action tremor. Power spectral density analysis shows that tremor suppression is accompanied by an increase in relative power in the low frequency band for both rest and action tremor. Most patients could (temporarily) phase lock their hand movements to the cueing signal of 1.6 Hz. Cueing signals at higher frequencies (3.2 and 4.8 Hz) could result in (n:m) phase locking of tremor as well as movement. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation results in a re-scaling of tremor, while auditory cueing may enhance suppression.

    AB - Introduction: In Parkinson’s disease rest and action tremor may occur. High frequency deep brain stimulation in basal ganglia nuclei has proved to be effective in the suppression of tremor. In addition, rhythmic auditory cues have shown to result in improved performance of repetitive movements, possibly by suppressing action tremor. The aim of this study was to investigate if electrical stimulation has similar effects on rest and action tremor, and whether in case of action tremor, the effect of electrical stimulation is similar to or enhanced by auditory cueing.Methods: Three exercises were carried out by 7 Parkinson’s disease patients treated with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: 1) sitting at rest; 2) performing a hand tapping movement as fast as possible; 3) performing hand movements on the rhythm of an auditory cueing signal. Inertial sensors registered the movement of the hands during the tests. The exercises were repeated for four different stimulation settings. Results: Electrical stimulation may either enhance or suppress rest and/or action tremor. Power spectral density analysis shows that tremor suppression is accompanied by an increase in relative power in the low frequency band for both rest and action tremor. Most patients could (temporarily) phase lock their hand movements to the cueing signal of 1.6 Hz. Cueing signals at higher frequencies (3.2 and 4.8 Hz) could result in (n:m) phase locking of tremor as well as movement. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation results in a re-scaling of tremor, while auditory cueing may enhance suppression.

    KW - METIS-285073

    KW - IR-79536

    KW - Deep Brain Stimulation

    KW - BSS-Electrical Neurostimulation

    KW - Parkinson's Disease

    KW - Rest tremor

    KW - EWI-21402

    KW - Action tremor

    M3 - Meeting Abstract

    VL - 18

    SP - S53-S54

    JO - Parkinsonism & Related Disorders

    JF - Parkinsonism & Related Disorders

    SN - 1353-8020

    IS - Suppl. 2

    ER -