Quantum Transport in Topological Matter

Research output: ThesisPhD Thesis - Research UT, graduation UTAcademic

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Abstract

As the optimization of current semiconductor based computer chip technology reaches its limits, the focus shifts towards development of novel techniques that have the potential to revolutionize the computer industry. Low-power electronics, high-density information storage and quantum computing all require extensive research into suitable materials. In this thesis, I present fundamental research on the physical properties of strongly correlated and topological materials, which are candidates to become the fundamental building blocks of a new generation of electronics. Through magnetotransport measurements, conductance spectroscopy and measurement of the inverse AC Josephson effect, we gain important information about the electronic structure of complex oxides and Dirac semimetals. Based the results, several conclusions come to light. First of all, while the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system may not be used as the functional part of future electronics, the results of this thesis demonstrate that the material is undoubtedly highly interesting and serves as an interesting platform for fundamental research into the interplay of intriguing phenomena. Furthermore, the 3D Dirac semimetal BiSb3% has proven to exhibit the exotic properties that Dirac materials are expected to contain. Using these properties, we show that Majorana zero modes can be detected as 4π-periodic bound states in S-DSM-S Josephson junctions. These signs of topological superconductivity are not restricted to artificially constructed devices, but may in principle also exist in nature. To this end, we investigate whether superconductor and Dirac semimetal PdTe2 shows signs of topological superconductivity, but conclude that this is not the case, so that for now the focus remains on artificially engineered materials for the utilization of topological superconductivity. To make the transition from fundamental proof-of-principle applications (such as described in this work) to functional electronics, as seen from an engineering perspective, high quality thin films are required.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • University of Twente
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Brinkman, A., Supervisor
  • Li, C., Co-Supervisor
Award date17 Jul 2019
Place of PublicationEnschede
Publisher
Print ISBNs978-90-365-4812-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jul 2019

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metalloids
superconductivity
theses
electronics
Josephson effect
quantum computation
Josephson junctions
alternating current
platforms
physical properties
industries
chips
engineering
electronic structure
optimization
oxides
shift
thin films
spectroscopy

Cite this

de Boer, J.C. . / Quantum Transport in Topological Matter. Enschede : University of Twente, 2019. 112 p.
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abstract = "As the optimization of current semiconductor based computer chip technology reaches its limits, the focus shifts towards development of novel techniques that have the potential to revolutionize the computer industry. Low-power electronics, high-density information storage and quantum computing all require extensive research into suitable materials. In this thesis, I present fundamental research on the physical properties of strongly correlated and topological materials, which are candidates to become the fundamental building blocks of a new generation of electronics. Through magnetotransport measurements, conductance spectroscopy and measurement of the inverse AC Josephson effect, we gain important information about the electronic structure of complex oxides and Dirac semimetals. Based the results, several conclusions come to light. First of all, while the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system may not be used as the functional part of future electronics, the results of this thesis demonstrate that the material is undoubtedly highly interesting and serves as an interesting platform for fundamental research into the interplay of intriguing phenomena. Furthermore, the 3D Dirac semimetal BiSb3{\%} has proven to exhibit the exotic properties that Dirac materials are expected to contain. Using these properties, we show that Majorana zero modes can be detected as 4π-periodic bound states in S-DSM-S Josephson junctions. These signs of topological superconductivity are not restricted to artificially constructed devices, but may in principle also exist in nature. To this end, we investigate whether superconductor and Dirac semimetal PdTe2 shows signs of topological superconductivity, but conclude that this is not the case, so that for now the focus remains on artificially engineered materials for the utilization of topological superconductivity. To make the transition from fundamental proof-of-principle applications (such as described in this work) to functional electronics, as seen from an engineering perspective, high quality thin films are required.",
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de Boer, JC 2019, 'Quantum Transport in Topological Matter', Doctor of Philosophy, University of Twente, Enschede. https://doi.org/10.3990/1.9789036548120

Quantum Transport in Topological Matter. / de Boer, J.C. .

Enschede : University of Twente, 2019. 112 p.

Research output: ThesisPhD Thesis - Research UT, graduation UTAcademic

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AU - de Boer, J.C.

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AB - As the optimization of current semiconductor based computer chip technology reaches its limits, the focus shifts towards development of novel techniques that have the potential to revolutionize the computer industry. Low-power electronics, high-density information storage and quantum computing all require extensive research into suitable materials. In this thesis, I present fundamental research on the physical properties of strongly correlated and topological materials, which are candidates to become the fundamental building blocks of a new generation of electronics. Through magnetotransport measurements, conductance spectroscopy and measurement of the inverse AC Josephson effect, we gain important information about the electronic structure of complex oxides and Dirac semimetals. Based the results, several conclusions come to light. First of all, while the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system may not be used as the functional part of future electronics, the results of this thesis demonstrate that the material is undoubtedly highly interesting and serves as an interesting platform for fundamental research into the interplay of intriguing phenomena. Furthermore, the 3D Dirac semimetal BiSb3% has proven to exhibit the exotic properties that Dirac materials are expected to contain. Using these properties, we show that Majorana zero modes can be detected as 4π-periodic bound states in S-DSM-S Josephson junctions. These signs of topological superconductivity are not restricted to artificially constructed devices, but may in principle also exist in nature. To this end, we investigate whether superconductor and Dirac semimetal PdTe2 shows signs of topological superconductivity, but conclude that this is not the case, so that for now the focus remains on artificially engineered materials for the utilization of topological superconductivity. To make the transition from fundamental proof-of-principle applications (such as described in this work) to functional electronics, as seen from an engineering perspective, high quality thin films are required.

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