Relationship between Framingham Risk Score and Left Ventricular Remodeling after Successful Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with First Myocardial Infarction and Single Vessel Disease

Marlon A.G.M. Olimulder, Michel A. Galjee, Jan van Es, Lodewijk J. Wagenaar, Martin G. Stoel, Gert K. van Houwelingen, J. (Hans) W. Louwerenburg, Frits H.A.F. de Man, Job van der Palen, Clemens von Birgelen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

74 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Limited data is available on the potential value of estimated cardiovascular event risk for prediction of left ventricular (LV) remodeling and size of infarcted tissue after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).

Methods: Therefore, we assessed in a consecutive series of patients with first STEMI, successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and single-vessel disease the potential relationship between the Framingham Risk Score and parameters of both LV remodeling and infarct tissue characteristics, as determined with contrast-enhanced (CE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) 6 months after the index event. Parameters of LV remodeling were end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, ejection fraction, and wall motion score index; infarct tissue characteristics comprised core, peri, and total infarct size, and transmural extent.

Results: A total of 25 patients (21 men, 56 ± 10 years) were studied, and the mean Framingham Risk Score was 14.1 ± 5.8%. There was a significant relation between Framingham Risk Score and multiple parameters of LV remodeling: LV ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and wall motion score index after 6 months (r=-0.55-0.76; p=0.000 for all). Framingham Risk Score showed no relation with various infarct tissue characteristics (ns). Male gender was the only component of the Framingham Risk Score that correlated individually with a few parameters of LV remodeling: LV end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume (p=0.000 for both).

Conclusion: In a series of consecutive patients with first STEMI, successful primary PCI, and single-vessel coronary artery disease, we observed a significant relation between the Framingham Risk Score and several CMRbased parameters of LV remodeling. The results of our small hypothesis-generating study underline the supremacy of multifactorial risk scores as tools for prediction of unfavorable cardiovascular outcome. Additionally, the data support the hypothesis that there might be a future role for a novel and specific multifactorial risk score in predicting unfavorable LV remodeling, which finally could trigger risk-adjusted preventive measures.
Original languageEnglish
Article number241
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of clinical & experimental cardiology
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Ventricular Remodeling
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Myocardial Infarction
Stroke Volume
Coronary Artery Disease
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • METIS-300499
  • IR-88540
  • Framingham risk score
  • Myocardial infarction
  • LV remodeling
  • Infarct tissue characteristics
  • Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

Cite this

Olimulder, Marlon A.G.M. ; Galjee, Michel A. ; van Es, Jan ; Wagenaar, Lodewijk J. ; Stoel, Martin G. ; van Houwelingen, Gert K. ; Louwerenburg, J. (Hans) W. ; de Man, Frits H.A.F. ; van der Palen, Job ; von Birgelen, Clemens. / Relationship between Framingham Risk Score and Left Ventricular Remodeling after Successful Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with First Myocardial Infarction and Single Vessel Disease. In: Journal of clinical & experimental cardiology. 2013 ; Vol. 4, No. 4.
@article{91158dc9428c40589ac9a31620dea13d,
title = "Relationship between Framingham Risk Score and Left Ventricular Remodeling after Successful Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with First Myocardial Infarction and Single Vessel Disease",
abstract = "Background: Limited data is available on the potential value of estimated cardiovascular event risk for prediction of left ventricular (LV) remodeling and size of infarcted tissue after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).Methods: Therefore, we assessed in a consecutive series of patients with first STEMI, successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and single-vessel disease the potential relationship between the Framingham Risk Score and parameters of both LV remodeling and infarct tissue characteristics, as determined with contrast-enhanced (CE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) 6 months after the index event. Parameters of LV remodeling were end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, ejection fraction, and wall motion score index; infarct tissue characteristics comprised core, peri, and total infarct size, and transmural extent.Results: A total of 25 patients (21 men, 56 ± 10 years) were studied, and the mean Framingham Risk Score was 14.1 ± 5.8{\%}. There was a significant relation between Framingham Risk Score and multiple parameters of LV remodeling: LV ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and wall motion score index after 6 months (r=-0.55-0.76; p=0.000 for all). Framingham Risk Score showed no relation with various infarct tissue characteristics (ns). Male gender was the only component of the Framingham Risk Score that correlated individually with a few parameters of LV remodeling: LV end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume (p=0.000 for both).Conclusion: In a series of consecutive patients with first STEMI, successful primary PCI, and single-vessel coronary artery disease, we observed a significant relation between the Framingham Risk Score and several CMRbased parameters of LV remodeling. The results of our small hypothesis-generating study underline the supremacy of multifactorial risk scores as tools for prediction of unfavorable cardiovascular outcome. Additionally, the data support the hypothesis that there might be a future role for a novel and specific multifactorial risk score in predicting unfavorable LV remodeling, which finally could trigger risk-adjusted preventive measures.",
keywords = "METIS-300499, IR-88540, Framingham risk score, Myocardial infarction, LV remodeling, Infarct tissue characteristics, Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging",
author = "Olimulder, {Marlon A.G.M.} and Galjee, {Michel A.} and {van Es}, Jan and Wagenaar, {Lodewijk J.} and Stoel, {Martin G.} and {van Houwelingen}, {Gert K.} and Louwerenburg, {J. (Hans) W.} and {de Man}, {Frits H.A.F.} and {van der Palen}, Job and {von Birgelen}, Clemens",
note = "Open access",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.4172/2155-9880.1000241",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
journal = "Journal of clinical & experimental cardiology",
issn = "2155-9880",
publisher = "OMICS Publishing Group",
number = "4",

}

Relationship between Framingham Risk Score and Left Ventricular Remodeling after Successful Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with First Myocardial Infarction and Single Vessel Disease. / Olimulder, Marlon A.G.M.; Galjee, Michel A.; van Es, Jan; Wagenaar, Lodewijk J.; Stoel, Martin G.; van Houwelingen, Gert K.; Louwerenburg, J. (Hans) W.; de Man, Frits H.A.F.; van der Palen, Job; von Birgelen, Clemens.

In: Journal of clinical & experimental cardiology, Vol. 4, No. 4, 241, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between Framingham Risk Score and Left Ventricular Remodeling after Successful Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with First Myocardial Infarction and Single Vessel Disease

AU - Olimulder, Marlon A.G.M.

AU - Galjee, Michel A.

AU - van Es, Jan

AU - Wagenaar, Lodewijk J.

AU - Stoel, Martin G.

AU - van Houwelingen, Gert K.

AU - Louwerenburg, J. (Hans) W.

AU - de Man, Frits H.A.F.

AU - van der Palen, Job

AU - von Birgelen, Clemens

N1 - Open access

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background: Limited data is available on the potential value of estimated cardiovascular event risk for prediction of left ventricular (LV) remodeling and size of infarcted tissue after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).Methods: Therefore, we assessed in a consecutive series of patients with first STEMI, successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and single-vessel disease the potential relationship between the Framingham Risk Score and parameters of both LV remodeling and infarct tissue characteristics, as determined with contrast-enhanced (CE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) 6 months after the index event. Parameters of LV remodeling were end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, ejection fraction, and wall motion score index; infarct tissue characteristics comprised core, peri, and total infarct size, and transmural extent.Results: A total of 25 patients (21 men, 56 ± 10 years) were studied, and the mean Framingham Risk Score was 14.1 ± 5.8%. There was a significant relation between Framingham Risk Score and multiple parameters of LV remodeling: LV ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and wall motion score index after 6 months (r=-0.55-0.76; p=0.000 for all). Framingham Risk Score showed no relation with various infarct tissue characteristics (ns). Male gender was the only component of the Framingham Risk Score that correlated individually with a few parameters of LV remodeling: LV end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume (p=0.000 for both).Conclusion: In a series of consecutive patients with first STEMI, successful primary PCI, and single-vessel coronary artery disease, we observed a significant relation between the Framingham Risk Score and several CMRbased parameters of LV remodeling. The results of our small hypothesis-generating study underline the supremacy of multifactorial risk scores as tools for prediction of unfavorable cardiovascular outcome. Additionally, the data support the hypothesis that there might be a future role for a novel and specific multifactorial risk score in predicting unfavorable LV remodeling, which finally could trigger risk-adjusted preventive measures.

AB - Background: Limited data is available on the potential value of estimated cardiovascular event risk for prediction of left ventricular (LV) remodeling and size of infarcted tissue after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).Methods: Therefore, we assessed in a consecutive series of patients with first STEMI, successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and single-vessel disease the potential relationship between the Framingham Risk Score and parameters of both LV remodeling and infarct tissue characteristics, as determined with contrast-enhanced (CE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) 6 months after the index event. Parameters of LV remodeling were end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, ejection fraction, and wall motion score index; infarct tissue characteristics comprised core, peri, and total infarct size, and transmural extent.Results: A total of 25 patients (21 men, 56 ± 10 years) were studied, and the mean Framingham Risk Score was 14.1 ± 5.8%. There was a significant relation between Framingham Risk Score and multiple parameters of LV remodeling: LV ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and wall motion score index after 6 months (r=-0.55-0.76; p=0.000 for all). Framingham Risk Score showed no relation with various infarct tissue characteristics (ns). Male gender was the only component of the Framingham Risk Score that correlated individually with a few parameters of LV remodeling: LV end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume (p=0.000 for both).Conclusion: In a series of consecutive patients with first STEMI, successful primary PCI, and single-vessel coronary artery disease, we observed a significant relation between the Framingham Risk Score and several CMRbased parameters of LV remodeling. The results of our small hypothesis-generating study underline the supremacy of multifactorial risk scores as tools for prediction of unfavorable cardiovascular outcome. Additionally, the data support the hypothesis that there might be a future role for a novel and specific multifactorial risk score in predicting unfavorable LV remodeling, which finally could trigger risk-adjusted preventive measures.

KW - METIS-300499

KW - IR-88540

KW - Framingham risk score

KW - Myocardial infarction

KW - LV remodeling

KW - Infarct tissue characteristics

KW - Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

U2 - 10.4172/2155-9880.1000241

DO - 10.4172/2155-9880.1000241

M3 - Article

VL - 4

JO - Journal of clinical & experimental cardiology

JF - Journal of clinical & experimental cardiology

SN - 2155-9880

IS - 4

M1 - 241

ER -