Relationship between socioeconomic status and weight gain during infancy: The BeeBOFT study

Lu Wang, Amy Van Grieken, Junwen Yang-Huang, Eline Vlasblom, Monique P. L’Hoir, Magda M. Boere-Boonekamp, Hein Raat* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Background Increased weight gain during infancy is a risk factor for obesity and related diseases in later life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and weight gain during infancy, and to identify the factors mediating the association between SES and infant weight gain. Methods Subjects were 2513 parent-child dyads participating in a cluster randomized controlled intervention study. Family SES was indexed by maternal education level. Weight gain in different time windows (infant age 0–3, 0–6, and 6–12 months) was calculated by subtracting the weight for age z-score (WAZ) between the two time-points. Path analysis was performed to examine the mediating pathways linking SES and infant weight gain. Results On average, infants of low-educated mothers had a lower birth weight and caught-up at approximately 6 months. In the period of 0–6 months, infants with low-educated mothers had an 0.42 (95% CI 0.27–0.57) higher gain in weight for age z-score compared to children with high-educated mothers. The association between maternal education level and increased infant weight gain in the period of 0–6 months can be explained by infant birth weight, gestational age at child birth, duration of breastfeeding, and age at introduction of complementary foods. After adjusting all the mediating factors, there was no association between maternal education level and infant weight gain. Conclusion Infants with lower SES had an increased weight gain during the first 6 months of infancy, and the effect can be explained by infant birth weight, gestational age at child birth, and infant feeding practices.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0205734
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2018

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infancy
socioeconomic status
Social Class
Weight Gain
Education
weight gain
Mothers
educational status
childbirth
Birth Weight
gestational age
birth weight
Gestational Age
complementary foods
infant feeding
Parturition
low birth weight
breast feeding
Breast Feeding
obesity

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Wang, L., Van Grieken, A., Yang-Huang, J., Vlasblom, E., L’Hoir, M. P., Boere-Boonekamp, M. M., & Raat, H. (2018). Relationship between socioeconomic status and weight gain during infancy: The BeeBOFT study. PLoS ONE, 13(11), [e0205734]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0205734
Wang, Lu ; Van Grieken, Amy ; Yang-Huang, Junwen ; Vlasblom, Eline ; L’Hoir, Monique P. ; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M. ; Raat, Hein. / Relationship between socioeconomic status and weight gain during infancy : The BeeBOFT study. In: PLoS ONE. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 11.
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title = "Relationship between socioeconomic status and weight gain during infancy: The BeeBOFT study",
abstract = "Background Increased weight gain during infancy is a risk factor for obesity and related diseases in later life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and weight gain during infancy, and to identify the factors mediating the association between SES and infant weight gain. Methods Subjects were 2513 parent-child dyads participating in a cluster randomized controlled intervention study. Family SES was indexed by maternal education level. Weight gain in different time windows (infant age 0–3, 0–6, and 6–12 months) was calculated by subtracting the weight for age z-score (WAZ) between the two time-points. Path analysis was performed to examine the mediating pathways linking SES and infant weight gain. Results On average, infants of low-educated mothers had a lower birth weight and caught-up at approximately 6 months. In the period of 0–6 months, infants with low-educated mothers had an 0.42 (95{\%} CI 0.27–0.57) higher gain in weight for age z-score compared to children with high-educated mothers. The association between maternal education level and increased infant weight gain in the period of 0–6 months can be explained by infant birth weight, gestational age at child birth, duration of breastfeeding, and age at introduction of complementary foods. After adjusting all the mediating factors, there was no association between maternal education level and infant weight gain. Conclusion Infants with lower SES had an increased weight gain during the first 6 months of infancy, and the effect can be explained by infant birth weight, gestational age at child birth, and infant feeding practices.",
author = "Lu Wang and {Van Grieken}, Amy and Junwen Yang-Huang and Eline Vlasblom and L’Hoir, {Monique P.} and Boere-Boonekamp, {Magda M.} and Hein Raat",
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Wang, L, Van Grieken, A, Yang-Huang, J, Vlasblom, E, L’Hoir, MP, Boere-Boonekamp, MM & Raat, H 2018, 'Relationship between socioeconomic status and weight gain during infancy: The BeeBOFT study', PLoS ONE, vol. 13, no. 11, e0205734. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0205734

Relationship between socioeconomic status and weight gain during infancy : The BeeBOFT study. / Wang, Lu; Van Grieken, Amy; Yang-Huang, Junwen; Vlasblom, Eline; L’Hoir, Monique P.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.; Raat, Hein (Corresponding Author).

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 13, No. 11, e0205734, 02.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between socioeconomic status and weight gain during infancy

T2 - The BeeBOFT study

AU - Wang, Lu

AU - Van Grieken, Amy

AU - Yang-Huang, Junwen

AU - Vlasblom, Eline

AU - L’Hoir, Monique P.

AU - Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.

AU - Raat, Hein

PY - 2018/11/2

Y1 - 2018/11/2

N2 - Background Increased weight gain during infancy is a risk factor for obesity and related diseases in later life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and weight gain during infancy, and to identify the factors mediating the association between SES and infant weight gain. Methods Subjects were 2513 parent-child dyads participating in a cluster randomized controlled intervention study. Family SES was indexed by maternal education level. Weight gain in different time windows (infant age 0–3, 0–6, and 6–12 months) was calculated by subtracting the weight for age z-score (WAZ) between the two time-points. Path analysis was performed to examine the mediating pathways linking SES and infant weight gain. Results On average, infants of low-educated mothers had a lower birth weight and caught-up at approximately 6 months. In the period of 0–6 months, infants with low-educated mothers had an 0.42 (95% CI 0.27–0.57) higher gain in weight for age z-score compared to children with high-educated mothers. The association between maternal education level and increased infant weight gain in the period of 0–6 months can be explained by infant birth weight, gestational age at child birth, duration of breastfeeding, and age at introduction of complementary foods. After adjusting all the mediating factors, there was no association between maternal education level and infant weight gain. Conclusion Infants with lower SES had an increased weight gain during the first 6 months of infancy, and the effect can be explained by infant birth weight, gestational age at child birth, and infant feeding practices.

AB - Background Increased weight gain during infancy is a risk factor for obesity and related diseases in later life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and weight gain during infancy, and to identify the factors mediating the association between SES and infant weight gain. Methods Subjects were 2513 parent-child dyads participating in a cluster randomized controlled intervention study. Family SES was indexed by maternal education level. Weight gain in different time windows (infant age 0–3, 0–6, and 6–12 months) was calculated by subtracting the weight for age z-score (WAZ) between the two time-points. Path analysis was performed to examine the mediating pathways linking SES and infant weight gain. Results On average, infants of low-educated mothers had a lower birth weight and caught-up at approximately 6 months. In the period of 0–6 months, infants with low-educated mothers had an 0.42 (95% CI 0.27–0.57) higher gain in weight for age z-score compared to children with high-educated mothers. The association between maternal education level and increased infant weight gain in the period of 0–6 months can be explained by infant birth weight, gestational age at child birth, duration of breastfeeding, and age at introduction of complementary foods. After adjusting all the mediating factors, there was no association between maternal education level and infant weight gain. Conclusion Infants with lower SES had an increased weight gain during the first 6 months of infancy, and the effect can be explained by infant birth weight, gestational age at child birth, and infant feeding practices.

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