Retrieval of soil erosion relevant parameters in the western Australian wheatbelt region from VNIR-SWIR and TIR spectral signatures

Andreas Eisele, Sabine Chabrillat, Ian Lau, Chiaki Kobayashi, Buddy Wheaton, Dan Carter, Osamu Kashimura, Masatane Kato, Cindy Ong, Robert Hewson, Thomas John Cudahy, Hermann Kaufmann

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

With the focus on new available hyperspectral imaging sensors sensitive within the thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength region, this study is testing the ability of the TIR in deriving soil erosion relevant parameters (e.g. texture, organic carbon content) from soil spectral measurements with the respect to commonly used VNIR-SWIR spectrometers. Therefore a study site was chosen located within an agricultural area in Western Australia, which is suffering from soil loss through wind erosion processes. VNIR-SWIR and TIR soil spectra derived from laboratory measurements using common field instruments were therefore resampled to imaging sensor spectral specifications (HyMAP and TASI-600). Prediction models have been established via multivariate regression analysis techniques to quantitatively estimate the soils' physical-chemical parameters using signatures from different spectral regions.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 10 Apr 201115 Apr 2011
https://www.isprs.org/proceedings/2011/ISRSE-34/

Conference

Conference34th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment - The GEOSS Era: Towards Operational Environmental Monitoring
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period10/04/1115/04/11
Internet address

Keywords

  • Organic carbon
  • Soil loss
  • Texture
  • Thermal infrared (TIR)

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