Rheological Properties of Aging Thermosensitive Suspensions

Eko H Purnomo, Dirk van den Ende, Jorrit Mellema, Frieder Mugele

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Abstract

Aging observed in soft glassy materials inherently affects the rheological properties of these systems and has been described by the soft glassy rheology (SGR) model [S. M. Fielding et al., J. Rheol. 44, 323 (2000)]. In this paper, we report the measured linear rheological behavior of thermosensitive microgel suspensions and compare it quantitatively with the predictions of the SGR model. The dynamic moduli [G[prime](omega,t) and G[double-prime](omega,t)] obtained from oscillatory measurements are in good agreement with the model. The model also predicts quantitatively the creep compliance J(t−tw,tw), obtained from step stress experiments, for the short time regime [(t−tw)<tw]. The relative effective temperature [script X]/[script X]g obtained from both the oscillatory and the step stress experiments is indeed less than 1 ([script X]/[script X]g<1) in agreement with the definition of aging. Moreover, the elasticity of the compressed particles (Gp) increases with increased compression, i.e., the degree of hindrance and consequently also the bulk elasticity (G[prime] and 1/J) increases with the degree of compression.
Original languageEnglish
Article number0211404
Number of pages8
JournalPhysical review E: Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics
Volume76
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Rheology
rheology
Elasticity
Compression
elastic properties
Creep
Compliance
Model
Experiment
Modulus
Predict
Prediction
predictions
temperature

Keywords

  • IR-59162
  • METIS-240289

Cite this

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title = "Rheological Properties of Aging Thermosensitive Suspensions",
abstract = "Aging observed in soft glassy materials inherently affects the rheological properties of these systems and has been described by the soft glassy rheology (SGR) model [S. M. Fielding et al., J. Rheol. 44, 323 (2000)]. In this paper, we report the measured linear rheological behavior of thermosensitive microgel suspensions and compare it quantitatively with the predictions of the SGR model. The dynamic moduli [G[prime](omega,t) and G[double-prime](omega,t)] obtained from oscillatory measurements are in good agreement with the model. The model also predicts quantitatively the creep compliance J(t−tw,tw), obtained from step stress experiments, for the short time regime [(t−tw)<tw]. The relative effective temperature [script X]/[script X]g obtained from both the oscillatory and the step stress experiments is indeed less than 1 ([script X]/[script X]g<1) in agreement with the definition of aging. Moreover, the elasticity of the compressed particles (Gp) increases with increased compression, i.e., the degree of hindrance and consequently also the bulk elasticity (G[prime] and 1/J) increases with the degree of compression.",
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Rheological Properties of Aging Thermosensitive Suspensions. / Purnomo, Eko H; van den Ende, Dirk; Mellema, Jorrit; Mugele, Frieder.

In: Physical review E: Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics, Vol. 76, No. 2, 0211404, 2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rheological Properties of Aging Thermosensitive Suspensions

AU - Purnomo, Eko H

AU - van den Ende, Dirk

AU - Mellema, Jorrit

AU - Mugele, Frieder

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Aging observed in soft glassy materials inherently affects the rheological properties of these systems and has been described by the soft glassy rheology (SGR) model [S. M. Fielding et al., J. Rheol. 44, 323 (2000)]. In this paper, we report the measured linear rheological behavior of thermosensitive microgel suspensions and compare it quantitatively with the predictions of the SGR model. The dynamic moduli [G[prime](omega,t) and G[double-prime](omega,t)] obtained from oscillatory measurements are in good agreement with the model. The model also predicts quantitatively the creep compliance J(t−tw,tw), obtained from step stress experiments, for the short time regime [(t−tw)<tw]. The relative effective temperature [script X]/[script X]g obtained from both the oscillatory and the step stress experiments is indeed less than 1 ([script X]/[script X]g<1) in agreement with the definition of aging. Moreover, the elasticity of the compressed particles (Gp) increases with increased compression, i.e., the degree of hindrance and consequently also the bulk elasticity (G[prime] and 1/J) increases with the degree of compression.

AB - Aging observed in soft glassy materials inherently affects the rheological properties of these systems and has been described by the soft glassy rheology (SGR) model [S. M. Fielding et al., J. Rheol. 44, 323 (2000)]. In this paper, we report the measured linear rheological behavior of thermosensitive microgel suspensions and compare it quantitatively with the predictions of the SGR model. The dynamic moduli [G[prime](omega,t) and G[double-prime](omega,t)] obtained from oscillatory measurements are in good agreement with the model. The model also predicts quantitatively the creep compliance J(t−tw,tw), obtained from step stress experiments, for the short time regime [(t−tw)<tw]. The relative effective temperature [script X]/[script X]g obtained from both the oscillatory and the step stress experiments is indeed less than 1 ([script X]/[script X]g<1) in agreement with the definition of aging. Moreover, the elasticity of the compressed particles (Gp) increases with increased compression, i.e., the degree of hindrance and consequently also the bulk elasticity (G[prime] and 1/J) increases with the degree of compression.

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