Role of Travel Time Information on Day-to-Day Route Choice Behavior Based on Real-World Experiments

Mariska van Essen, Tom Thomas, Caspar Chorus, Eric C. van Berkum

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

It is widely believed that travel time information leads to reductions in traffic congestion and thereby improves network efficiency. An important research topic within travel behavior research is therefore how car drivers choose their routes, specifically when they receive travel time information. This research aims to obtain insights in the role of travel information on day-to-day route choice behavior using route choice data obtained from two real-world experiments. In the first experiment, individuals had to make five different trips for several days, choosing between two route alternatives. In the second experiment, individuals also received pre-trip travel time information. The analysis focuses on route switching and choice evolution at both the aggregated and disaggregated levels. At the aggregated level, it is found that switching propensity decreases more abruptly over time when information is provided. Overall, 67% of the switches are made in compliance with this information. Furthermore, information seems to be most influential if route alternatives have similar travel times. At the disaggregated level, six individual choice evolution profiles are identified, varying from switch-aversive to switch-sensitive behavior. An individual might reveal different profiles on the different origin and destination (OD)-pairs. When no travel time information is provided, shifts in revealed profiles from one OD-pair to another vary significantly among individuals. These shifts are more ‘bundled’ in response to travel time information. These results provide a deeper understanding of the role of travel time information on real- world route choice behavior. This is helpful when applying travel time information as an effective travel demand management measure.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of The 95th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Board, Washington DC, USA, 10-14 January 2016
Place of PublicationWashington, DC
PublisherTransportation Research Board (TRB)
Pages1-20
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jan 2016
Event95th Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting 2016 - Washington, United States
Duration: 10 Jan 201614 Oct 2016
Conference number: 95

Conference

Conference95th Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting 2016
CountryUnited States
CityWashington
Period10/01/1614/10/16

Fingerprint

Travel time
Experiment
Route choice
Choice behavior
Destination
Demand management
Car
Traffic congestion
Travel demand
Propensity
Travel behavior

Keywords

  • IR-104860
  • METIS-312205

Cite this

van Essen, M., Thomas, T., Chorus, C., & van Berkum, E. C. (2016). Role of Travel Time Information on Day-to-Day Route Choice Behavior Based on Real-World Experiments. In Proceedings of The 95th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Board, Washington DC, USA, 10-14 January 2016 (pp. 1-20). Washington, DC: Transportation Research Board (TRB).
van Essen, Mariska ; Thomas, Tom ; Chorus, Caspar ; van Berkum, Eric C. / Role of Travel Time Information on Day-to-Day Route Choice Behavior Based on Real-World Experiments. Proceedings of The 95th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Board, Washington DC, USA, 10-14 January 2016. Washington, DC : Transportation Research Board (TRB), 2016. pp. 1-20
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abstract = "It is widely believed that travel time information leads to reductions in traffic congestion and thereby improves network efficiency. An important research topic within travel behavior research is therefore how car drivers choose their routes, specifically when they receive travel time information. This research aims to obtain insights in the role of travel information on day-to-day route choice behavior using route choice data obtained from two real-world experiments. In the first experiment, individuals had to make five different trips for several days, choosing between two route alternatives. In the second experiment, individuals also received pre-trip travel time information. The analysis focuses on route switching and choice evolution at both the aggregated and disaggregated levels. At the aggregated level, it is found that switching propensity decreases more abruptly over time when information is provided. Overall, 67{\%} of the switches are made in compliance with this information. Furthermore, information seems to be most influential if route alternatives have similar travel times. At the disaggregated level, six individual choice evolution profiles are identified, varying from switch-aversive to switch-sensitive behavior. An individual might reveal different profiles on the different origin and destination (OD)-pairs. When no travel time information is provided, shifts in revealed profiles from one OD-pair to another vary significantly among individuals. These shifts are more ‘bundled’ in response to travel time information. These results provide a deeper understanding of the role of travel time information on real- world route choice behavior. This is helpful when applying travel time information as an effective travel demand management measure.",
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van Essen, M, Thomas, T, Chorus, C & van Berkum, EC 2016, Role of Travel Time Information on Day-to-Day Route Choice Behavior Based on Real-World Experiments. in Proceedings of The 95th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Board, Washington DC, USA, 10-14 January 2016. Transportation Research Board (TRB), Washington, DC, pp. 1-20, 95th Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting 2016, Washington, United States, 10/01/16.

Role of Travel Time Information on Day-to-Day Route Choice Behavior Based on Real-World Experiments. / van Essen, Mariska; Thomas, Tom ; Chorus, Caspar; van Berkum, Eric C.

Proceedings of The 95th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Board, Washington DC, USA, 10-14 January 2016. Washington, DC : Transportation Research Board (TRB), 2016. p. 1-20.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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N2 - It is widely believed that travel time information leads to reductions in traffic congestion and thereby improves network efficiency. An important research topic within travel behavior research is therefore how car drivers choose their routes, specifically when they receive travel time information. This research aims to obtain insights in the role of travel information on day-to-day route choice behavior using route choice data obtained from two real-world experiments. In the first experiment, individuals had to make five different trips for several days, choosing between two route alternatives. In the second experiment, individuals also received pre-trip travel time information. The analysis focuses on route switching and choice evolution at both the aggregated and disaggregated levels. At the aggregated level, it is found that switching propensity decreases more abruptly over time when information is provided. Overall, 67% of the switches are made in compliance with this information. Furthermore, information seems to be most influential if route alternatives have similar travel times. At the disaggregated level, six individual choice evolution profiles are identified, varying from switch-aversive to switch-sensitive behavior. An individual might reveal different profiles on the different origin and destination (OD)-pairs. When no travel time information is provided, shifts in revealed profiles from one OD-pair to another vary significantly among individuals. These shifts are more ‘bundled’ in response to travel time information. These results provide a deeper understanding of the role of travel time information on real- world route choice behavior. This is helpful when applying travel time information as an effective travel demand management measure.

AB - It is widely believed that travel time information leads to reductions in traffic congestion and thereby improves network efficiency. An important research topic within travel behavior research is therefore how car drivers choose their routes, specifically when they receive travel time information. This research aims to obtain insights in the role of travel information on day-to-day route choice behavior using route choice data obtained from two real-world experiments. In the first experiment, individuals had to make five different trips for several days, choosing between two route alternatives. In the second experiment, individuals also received pre-trip travel time information. The analysis focuses on route switching and choice evolution at both the aggregated and disaggregated levels. At the aggregated level, it is found that switching propensity decreases more abruptly over time when information is provided. Overall, 67% of the switches are made in compliance with this information. Furthermore, information seems to be most influential if route alternatives have similar travel times. At the disaggregated level, six individual choice evolution profiles are identified, varying from switch-aversive to switch-sensitive behavior. An individual might reveal different profiles on the different origin and destination (OD)-pairs. When no travel time information is provided, shifts in revealed profiles from one OD-pair to another vary significantly among individuals. These shifts are more ‘bundled’ in response to travel time information. These results provide a deeper understanding of the role of travel time information on real- world route choice behavior. This is helpful when applying travel time information as an effective travel demand management measure.

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van Essen M, Thomas T, Chorus C, van Berkum EC. Role of Travel Time Information on Day-to-Day Route Choice Behavior Based on Real-World Experiments. In Proceedings of The 95th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Board, Washington DC, USA, 10-14 January 2016. Washington, DC: Transportation Research Board (TRB). 2016. p. 1-20