Sex differences in onset to hospital arrival time, prestroke disability, and clinical symptoms in patients with a large vessel occlusion: A MR CLEAN Registry substudy

Mariam Ali*, Anne Van Der Meij, Hendrikus J.A. Van Os, Mahsoem Ali, Erik W. Van Zwet, Fianne H.M. Spaander, Jeanette Hofmeijer, Paul J. Nederkoorn, Ido R. Van Den Wijngaard, Charles B.L.M. Majoie, Adriaan C.G.M. Van Es, Wouter J. Schonewille, Marianne A.A. Van Walderveen, Diederik W.J. Dippel, Marieke C. Visser, Nyika D. Kruyt, Marieke J.H. Wermer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Women have been reported to have worse outcomes after endovascular treatment (EVT), despite a similar treatment effect in non-clinical trial populations. We aimed to assess sex differences at hospital presentation with respect to workflow metrics, prestroke disability, and presenting clinical symptoms. Methods: We included consecutive patients from the Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischaemic Stroke in The Netherlands (MR CLEAN) Registry (2014-2018) who received EVT for anterior circulation large vessel occlusion (LVO). We assessed sex differences in workflow metrics, prestroke disability (modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≥1), and stroke severity and symptoms according to the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on hospital admission with logistic and linear regression analyses and calculated the adjusted OR (aOR). Results: We included 4872 patients (47.6% women). Compared with men, women were older (median age 76 vs 70 years) and less often achieved good functional outcome at 90 days (mRS ≤2: 35.2% vs 46.4%, aOR 0.70, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.82). Mean onset-To-door time was longer in women (2 hours 16 min vs 2 hours 7 min, adjusted delay 9 min, 95% CI 4 to 13). This delay contributed to longer onset-To-groin times (3 hours 26 min in women vs 3 hours 13 min in men, adjusted delay 13 min, 95% CI 9 to 17). Women more often had prestroke disability (mRS ≥1: 41.1% vs 29.1%, aOR 1.57, 95% CI 1.36 to 1.82). NIHSS on admission was essentially similar in men and women (mean 15±6 vs 15±6, NIHSS <10 vs ≥10, aOR 0.91, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.06). There were no clear sex differences in the occurrence of specific stroke symptoms. Conclusion: Women with LVO had longer onset-To-door times and more often prestroke disability than men. Raising awareness of these differences at hospital presentation and investigating underlying causes may help to improve outcome after EVT in women.

Original languageEnglish
Article number019670
JournalJournal of NeuroInterventional Surgery
Volume15
Issue numbere2
Early online date15 Nov 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2023

Keywords

  • NLA
  • Stroke
  • Thrombectomy
  • Intervention

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