Silicon spintronics at room temperature

S.P. Dash, S. Sharma, J.C. le Breton, R. Jansen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The electrical injection and detection of spin-polarized carriers in semiconductors at room temperature has been one of the key challenges in spintronics. Exploiting spin functionality in silicon, the dominant electronic material, is particularly crucial in order to realize the next generation of information processing devices based on spin. Here we present our recent demonstration of electrical spin injection into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, the spin manipulation via the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation, all at room temperature. A control experiment that makes use of a non-magnetic nanolayer inserted between the ferromagnet and the tunnel barrier supports the data, proving spin injection and excluding any spurious signals. We also report Hanle effect measurements in two-terminal geometry and show that in this configuration the Hanle signal is always dominated by spin accumulation below the two individual contacts, rather than spin transport from injector to detector through the semiconductor channel. The results provide many new insights and open a platform for further exploration of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices operating at ambient temperature
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSpintronics III
Subtitle of host publication1-4 August 2010, San Diego, California, United States
EditorsHenri-Jean M. Drouhin, Jean-Eric Wegrowe, Manijeh Razeqhi
PublisherSPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Pages77600J
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9780819482563
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventSpintronics III - San Diego, United States
Duration: 1 Aug 20104 Aug 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE
PublisherSPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume7760
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Conference

ConferenceSpintronics III
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period1/08/104/08/10

Fingerprint

silicon
room temperature
injection
tunnels
injectors
ambient temperature
manipulators
platforms
detectors
geometry
configurations
electronics

Keywords

  • Spin-polarized tunneling
  • room temperature
  • Hanle effect
  • silicon spintronics
  • electrical spin injection
  • IR-77694

Cite this

Dash, S. P., Sharma, S., le Breton, J. C., & Jansen, R. (2010). Silicon spintronics at room temperature. In H-J. M. Drouhin, J-E. Wegrowe, & M. Razeqhi (Eds.), Spintronics III: 1-4 August 2010, San Diego, California, United States (pp. 77600J). (Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 7760). SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.860150
Dash, S.P. ; Sharma, S. ; le Breton, J.C. ; Jansen, R. / Silicon spintronics at room temperature. Spintronics III: 1-4 August 2010, San Diego, California, United States. editor / Henri-Jean M. Drouhin ; Jean-Eric Wegrowe ; Manijeh Razeqhi. SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 2010. pp. 77600J (Proceedings of SPIE).
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abstract = "The electrical injection and detection of spin-polarized carriers in semiconductors at room temperature has been one of the key challenges in spintronics. Exploiting spin functionality in silicon, the dominant electronic material, is particularly crucial in order to realize the next generation of information processing devices based on spin. Here we present our recent demonstration of electrical spin injection into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, the spin manipulation via the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation, all at room temperature. A control experiment that makes use of a non-magnetic nanolayer inserted between the ferromagnet and the tunnel barrier supports the data, proving spin injection and excluding any spurious signals. We also report Hanle effect measurements in two-terminal geometry and show that in this configuration the Hanle signal is always dominated by spin accumulation below the two individual contacts, rather than spin transport from injector to detector through the semiconductor channel. The results provide many new insights and open a platform for further exploration of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices operating at ambient temperature",
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Dash, SP, Sharma, S, le Breton, JC & Jansen, R 2010, Silicon spintronics at room temperature. in H-JM Drouhin, J-E Wegrowe & M Razeqhi (eds), Spintronics III: 1-4 August 2010, San Diego, California, United States. Proceedings of SPIE, vol. 7760, SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, pp. 77600J, Spintronics III, San Diego, United States, 1/08/10. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.860150

Silicon spintronics at room temperature. / Dash, S.P.; Sharma, S.; le Breton, J.C.; Jansen, R.

Spintronics III: 1-4 August 2010, San Diego, California, United States. ed. / Henri-Jean M. Drouhin; Jean-Eric Wegrowe; Manijeh Razeqhi. SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 2010. p. 77600J (Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 7760).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

TY - CHAP

T1 - Silicon spintronics at room temperature

AU - Dash, S.P.

AU - Sharma, S.

AU - le Breton, J.C.

AU - Jansen, R.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - The electrical injection and detection of spin-polarized carriers in semiconductors at room temperature has been one of the key challenges in spintronics. Exploiting spin functionality in silicon, the dominant electronic material, is particularly crucial in order to realize the next generation of information processing devices based on spin. Here we present our recent demonstration of electrical spin injection into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, the spin manipulation via the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation, all at room temperature. A control experiment that makes use of a non-magnetic nanolayer inserted between the ferromagnet and the tunnel barrier supports the data, proving spin injection and excluding any spurious signals. We also report Hanle effect measurements in two-terminal geometry and show that in this configuration the Hanle signal is always dominated by spin accumulation below the two individual contacts, rather than spin transport from injector to detector through the semiconductor channel. The results provide many new insights and open a platform for further exploration of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices operating at ambient temperature

AB - The electrical injection and detection of spin-polarized carriers in semiconductors at room temperature has been one of the key challenges in spintronics. Exploiting spin functionality in silicon, the dominant electronic material, is particularly crucial in order to realize the next generation of information processing devices based on spin. Here we present our recent demonstration of electrical spin injection into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, the spin manipulation via the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation, all at room temperature. A control experiment that makes use of a non-magnetic nanolayer inserted between the ferromagnet and the tunnel barrier supports the data, proving spin injection and excluding any spurious signals. We also report Hanle effect measurements in two-terminal geometry and show that in this configuration the Hanle signal is always dominated by spin accumulation below the two individual contacts, rather than spin transport from injector to detector through the semiconductor channel. The results provide many new insights and open a platform for further exploration of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices operating at ambient temperature

KW - Spin-polarized tunneling

KW - room temperature

KW - Hanle effect

KW - silicon spintronics

KW - electrical spin injection

KW - IR-77694

U2 - 10.1117/12.860150

DO - 10.1117/12.860150

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780819482563

T3 - Proceedings of SPIE

SP - 77600J

BT - Spintronics III

A2 - Drouhin, Henri-Jean M.

A2 - Wegrowe, Jean-Eric

A2 - Razeqhi, Manijeh

PB - SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

ER -

Dash SP, Sharma S, le Breton JC, Jansen R. Silicon spintronics at room temperature. In Drouhin H-JM, Wegrowe J-E, Razeqhi M, editors, Spintronics III: 1-4 August 2010, San Diego, California, United States. SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. 2010. p. 77600J. (Proceedings of SPIE). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.860150