Simulating anisotropic droplet shapes on chemically striped patterned surfaces

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60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The equilibrium shape of droplets on surfaces, functionalized with stripes of alternating wettability, have been investigated using simulations employing a finite element method. Experiments show that a droplet deposited on a surface with relatively narrow hydrophobic stripes compared to the hydrophilic stripes adopts a strongly elongated shape. The aspect ratio, the length of the droplet divided by the width, decreases toward unity when a droplet is deposited on a surface with relatively narrow hydrophilic stripes. The aspect ratio and the contact angle parallel to the stripes show unique scaling behavior as a function of the ratio between the widths of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes. For a small ratio, the contact angle parallel to the stripes is low and the aspect ratio high, while for a large ratio, the contact angle parallel is high and the aspect ratio low. The simulations exhibit similar scaling behavior, both for the aspect ratio of the droplets and for the contact angles in the direction parallel to the stripes. Two liquids with different surface tensions have been investigated both experimentally and in simulations; similarities and differences between the findings are discussed. Generally, three parameters are needed to describe the droplet geometry: (i) the equilibrium contact angles on the hydrophilic and (ii) hydrophobic areas and (iii) the ratio of the widths of these chemically defined stripes. Furthermore, we derive a simple analytical expression that proves to be a good approximation in the quantitative description of the droplet aspect ratio
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)499-505
Number of pages7
JournalLangmuir
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • METIS-286051
  • IR-84667

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