Simulating casualty transportation and allocation policies for mass casualty incident scenarios

Florentina Hager, Franziska Barbara Metz, Melanie Reuter - Oppermann

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Abstract

During mass casualty events, fast medical care must be provided to often many affected individuals. When resources like ambulances are limited, decision makers may need to consider incorporating mass transportation vehicles to assist with transportation. With time being a crucial factor, on-field decisions are typically based on practical and straightforward policies, such as sending casualties to the closest hospital until the capacity limit is reached. However, the integration of mass transportation vehicles necessitates a re-evaluation of these conventional policies. Therefore, this study aims to develop and evaluate various casualty transportation and allocation policies during mass casualty incidents using discrete-event simulation. An important feature of this study is the differentiation between life-threateningly and severely injured casualties. Life-threateningly injured casualties require immediate transportation to a hospital, whereas the latter can be considered stable enough to be transported using alternative modes of transportation, freeing up ambulances and decreasing overall transportation times.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 57th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Pages2116-2125
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-9981331-7-1
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jan 2024
Event57th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2024 - Waikiki Beach, United States
Duration: 3 Jan 20246 Jan 2024
Conference number: 57

Conference

Conference57th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2024
Abbreviated titleHICSS 2024
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityWaikiki Beach
Period3/01/246/01/24

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