Sketching is more than making correct drawings

Remko Martijn Waanders, Wouter Eggink, Maaike Mulder-Nijkamp

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Sketching in the context of a design process is not a goal in itself, but can be considered as a tool to make better designs. Sketching as a design tool has several useful effects as: ordering your thoughts, better understanding of difficult shapes, functioning as a communication tool, and providing an iterative way of developing shapes. In our bachelor-curriculum Industrial Design Engineering we developed a series of courses that addresses these effects in particular. The courses are Sketching and concept drawing (SCT), Product Presentation Drawing (PPT) and Applied sketching skills (TTV). This line of courses is built on three pillars: - Learning to sketch; Theory, speed and control of the materials. - Learning from sketching; Develop a better insight in complex 3D shapes (Figure 1). - Sketching as a design tool; Communication, ordering your thoughts, iterative working. As a result we see that students who have finished the courses instinctively start sketching in an iterative manner, use sketching as a source of inspiration and learn that the whole process of iterative sketching helps in structuring, developing and communicating the design process. In this way the students become better sketchers and better designers
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDesign Education for Creativity and Business Innovation: 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education
EditorsA. Kovacevic, W. Ion, C. McMahon, C. Buck, P. Hogarth
Place of PublicationLondon, UK
PublisherThe Design Society
Pages299-304
ISBN (Print)9781904670339
Publication statusPublished - 8 Sep 2011
Event13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, E&PDE 2011: Design Education for Creativity and Business Innovation - London City University, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 8 Sep 20119 Sep 2011
Conference number: 13

Publication series

Name
PublisherDesign Society

Conference

Conference13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, E&PDE 2011
Abbreviated titleE&PDE
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period8/09/119/09/11

Fingerprint

Drawing (graphics)
Communication
Product design
Curricula
Students

Keywords

  • METIS-278293
  • IR-78413
  • sketching
  • iterative sketching
  • Design Education
  • Drawing

Cite this

Waanders, R. M., Eggink, W., & Mulder-Nijkamp, M. (2011). Sketching is more than making correct drawings. In A. Kovacevic, W. Ion, C. McMahon, C. Buck, & P. Hogarth (Eds.), Design Education for Creativity and Business Innovation: 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (pp. 299-304). London, UK: The Design Society.
Waanders, Remko Martijn ; Eggink, Wouter ; Mulder-Nijkamp, Maaike. / Sketching is more than making correct drawings. Design Education for Creativity and Business Innovation: 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education. editor / A. Kovacevic ; W. Ion ; C. McMahon ; C. Buck ; P. Hogarth. London, UK : The Design Society, 2011. pp. 299-304
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Waanders, RM, Eggink, W & Mulder-Nijkamp, M 2011, Sketching is more than making correct drawings. in A Kovacevic, W Ion, C McMahon, C Buck & P Hogarth (eds), Design Education for Creativity and Business Innovation: 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education. The Design Society, London, UK, pp. 299-304, 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, E&PDE 2011, London, United Kingdom, 8/09/11.

Sketching is more than making correct drawings. / Waanders, Remko Martijn; Eggink, Wouter; Mulder-Nijkamp, Maaike.

Design Education for Creativity and Business Innovation: 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education. ed. / A. Kovacevic; W. Ion; C. McMahon; C. Buck; P. Hogarth. London, UK : The Design Society, 2011. p. 299-304.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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Waanders RM, Eggink W, Mulder-Nijkamp M. Sketching is more than making correct drawings. In Kovacevic A, Ion W, McMahon C, Buck C, Hogarth P, editors, Design Education for Creativity and Business Innovation: 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education. London, UK: The Design Society. 2011. p. 299-304