Sources of Social Support as Predictors of Health, Psychological Well-Being and Life Satisfaction Among Dutch Male and Female Dual-Earners

Geertje van Daalen, Karin Sanders, Tineke M. Willemsen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    48 Citations (Scopus)
    219 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    We examined whether gender differences in health, psychological well-being, and life satisfaction, can be explained by effects of work-related and nonwork-related sources of social support. The sample consisted of 459 men and women from dual earner families. Men report better health and psychological well-being than women, whereas women report higher life satisfaction than men. Contrary to our expectations, women receive more social support from colleagues than men, while men and women equally receive support from their supervisor. As for the nonwork-related sources of social support, men receive more social support from their spouse, while women receive more social support from relatives and friends. No gender differences exist in the effects of social support. Although men and women differ with respect to the social support they receive from different sources, these differences cannot explain gender differences in health, psychological well-being and life satisfaction.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)43-62
    JournalWomen & health
    Volume41
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

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