Spectral Absorption Feature Analysis for Finding Ore: A Tutorial on Using the Method in Geological Remote Sensing

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Abstract

Geologists have been instrumental in shaping Earth observation satellite missions; likewise, geology has been the subject of many remote sensing studies [1]. Applications of optical remote sensing in geology date back to some early studies using the Earth Resources Technology Satellite-1, the predecessor of the Landsat satellite program [2]. In the 1980s, the seventh channel in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) of the Landsat thematic mapper program was added, as a result of spectroscopic mineral studies by geologists [58]. A subsequent satellite-borne instrument, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), launched in 1999, had specific bands in the SWIR and thermal infrared dedicated to mapping mineral groups [3].
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-71
Number of pages21
JournalIEEE geoscience and remote sensing magazine
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

geology
Landsat 1
Ores
remote sensing
satellite-borne instruments
Remote sensing
Landsat satellites
minerals
Satellites
thematic mappers (LANDSAT)
absorption spectra
thermal emission
Geology
radiometers
Infrared radiation
Minerals
satellite mission
ASTER
Earth (planet)
mineral

Keywords

  • ITC-ISI-JOURNAL-ARTICLE

Cite this

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abstract = "Geologists have been instrumental in shaping Earth observation satellite missions; likewise, geology has been the subject of many remote sensing studies [1]. Applications of optical remote sensing in geology date back to some early studies using the Earth Resources Technology Satellite-1, the predecessor of the Landsat satellite program [2]. In the 1980s, the seventh channel in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) of the Landsat thematic mapper program was added, as a result of spectroscopic mineral studies by geologists [58]. A subsequent satellite-borne instrument, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), launched in 1999, had specific bands in the SWIR and thermal infrared dedicated to mapping mineral groups [3].",
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author = "C. Hecker and {Van Ruitenbeek}, F.J.A. and {van der Werff}, H.M.A. and W.H. Bakker and R.D. Hewson and {van der Meer}, F.D.",
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AU - Hecker, C.

AU - Van Ruitenbeek, F.J.A.

AU - van der Werff, H.M.A.

AU - Bakker, W.H.

AU - Hewson, R.D.

AU - van der Meer, F.D.

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