Sprouting productivity and allometric relationships of two oak species managed for traditional charcoal making in central Mexico.

R. Aguilar, A. Ghilardi, E. Vega, Margaret Skutsch, K. Oyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sustainable production systems for woodfuels in developing countries require basic information on tree productivity, and particularly on their coppicing productivity under current forms of management. We report biomass equations and sprouting productivity of two oak species (Quercus castanea and Quercus laeta) subject to traditional forms of woodfuel harvesting at Cuitzeo basin in central Mexico. Biomass components analyzed were total aboveground biomass (AGB), woody biomass suitable for charcoal making (WSC) and residues (foliage and small branches). The estimation of total aboveground biomass (AGB) and woody biomass suitable for charcoal making (WSC) of individual trees, when expressed as a function of DBH in the form y = a(DBH)b, resulted in values of pseudo-R2 higher than 92%. The Mean Annual Increment (MAI) of both species increased with site age. Significant differences were found in regrowth rates of these species. Maximum charcoal potential productivity in kg ha−1 year−1 is achieved between 30 and 50 years depending on the decay rate of coppicing-shoot density over time. This roughly doubles current harvest cycles of 10–15 years followed by charcoalers. Oaks in developing countries have the potential to be used as a mid-term rotation coppice species for energy purposes. We argue that the results shown in this study are an important input for designing appropriate management strategies for traditional oak charcoal production in developing countries
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-207
JournalBiomass & bioenergy
Volume36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • METIS-286949
  • IR-81033

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