Stretch Evoked Potentials in Healthy Subjects and After Stroke: A Potential Measure for Proprioceptive Sensorimotor Function

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Abstract

Sensory feedback is of vital importance in motor control, yet rarely assessed in diseases with impaired motor function like stroke. Muscle stretch evoked potentials (StrEPs) may serve as a measure of cortical sensorimotor activation in response to proprioceptive input. The aim of this study is: 1) to determine early and late features of the StrEP and 2) to explore whether StrEP waveform and features can be measured after stroke. Consistency of StrEP waveforms and features was evaluated in 22 normal subjects. StrEP features and similarity between hemispheres were evaluated in eight subacute stroke subjects. StrEPs of normal subjects had a consistent shape across conditions and sessions (mean cross correlation waveforms > 0.75). Stroke subjects showed heterogeneous StrEP waveforms. Stroke subjects presented a normal early peak (40 ms after movement onset) but later peaks had abnormal amplitudes and latencies. No significant differences between stroke subjects with good and poor motor function were found (P > 0.14). With the consistent responses of normal subjects the StrEP meets a prerequisite for potential clinical value. Recording of StrEPs is feasible even in subacute stroke survivors with poor motor function. How StrEP features relate to clinical phenotypes and recovery needs further investigation
Original languageEnglish
Article number7004050
Pages (from-to)643-654
Number of pages12
JournalIEEE transactions on neural systems and rehabilitation engineering
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • IR-96580
  • METIS-311010

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