Structural transitions and energy landscape for cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid mechanics from nanoindentation in vitro and in silico

O. Kononova, J. Snijder, M. Brasch, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria Cornelissen, R.I. Dima, K.A. Marx, G.J.L. Wuite, G.J.L. Wuite, W.H. Roos, V. Barsegova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)
15 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Physical properties of capsids of plant and animal viruses are important factors in capsid self-assembly, survival of viruses in the extracellular environment, and their cell infectivity. Combined AFM experiments and computational modeling on subsecond timescales of the indentation nanomechanics of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus capsid show that the capsid’s physical properties are dynamic and local characteristics of the structure, which change with the depth of indentation and depend on the magnitude and geometry of mechanical input. Under large deformations, the Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus capsid transitions to the collapsed state without substantial local structural alterations. The enthalpy change in this deformation state ΔHind = 11.5–12.8 MJ/mol is mostly due to large-amplitude out-of-plane excitations, which contribute to the capsid bending; the entropy change TΔSind = 5.1–5.8 MJ/mol is due to coherent in-plane rearrangements of protein chains, which mediate the capsid stiffening. Direct coupling of these modes defines the extent of (ir)reversibility of capsid indentation dynamics correlated with its (in)elastic mechanical response to the compressive force. This emerging picture illuminates how unique physico-chemical properties of protein nanoshells help define their structure and morphology, and determine their viruses’ biological function
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1893-1903
Number of pages9
JournalBiophysical journal
Volume105
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Structural transitions and energy landscape for cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid mechanics from nanoindentation in vitro and in silico'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this