Summary for AVEC 2018: Bipolar disorder and cross-cultural affect recognition

Fabien Ringeval, Björn Schuller*, Michel Valstar, Roddy Cowie, Maja Pantic

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The eighth Audio-Visual Emotion Challenge and workshop AVEC 2018 was held in conjunction with ACM Multimedia'18. This year, the AVEC series addressed major novelties with three distinct sub-challenges: bipolar disorder classification, cross-cultural dimensional emotion recognition, and emotional label generation from individual ratings. The Bipolar Disorder Sub-challenge was based on a novel dataset of structured interviews of patients suffering from bipolar disorder (BD corpus), the Cross-cultural Emotion Sub-challenge relied on an extension of the SEWA dataset, which includes human-human interactions recorded 'in-the-wild' for the German and the Hungarian cultures, and the Gold-standard Emotion Sub-challenge was based on the RECOLA dataset, which was previously used in the AVEC series for emotion recognition. In this summary, we mainly describe participation and conditions of the AVEC Challenge.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationMM 2018 - Proceedings of the 2018 ACM Multimedia Conference
    PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
    Pages2111-2112
    Number of pages2
    ISBN (Electronic)9781450356657
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2018
    Event26th ACM Multimedia conference, MM 2018 - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
    Duration: 22 Oct 201826 Oct 2018
    Conference number: 26

    Conference

    Conference26th ACM Multimedia conference, MM 2018
    Abbreviated titleMM 2018
    CountryKorea, Republic of
    CitySeoul
    Period22/10/1826/10/18

    Keywords

    • Affective Computing
    • Bipolar Disorder
    • Cross-Cultural Emotion

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