Survey of electronic payment methods and systems

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    442 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    In this paper an overview of electronic payment methods and systems is given. This survey is done as part of the Moby Dick project. Electronic payment systems can be grouped into three broad classes: traditional money transactions, digital currency and creditdebit payments. Such payment systems have a number of requirements: e.g. security, acceptability, convenience, cost, anonymity, control, traceability and control of encryption methods. Some requirements appear contradictory and tradeoffs have to be made: - traceability versus anonymity, - on-line versus off-line, - use of dedicated tamper-resistance hardware versus software only. We further present an introduction to the basics of electronic money: encryption, digital signatures, anonymity, and solutions to the double spending problem for digital cash. We give a survey of payment mechanisms, that are either commercially or in a pilot version available today or have been published recently.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationWeb technology, new media, communications and telematics theory, methods, tools and applications (Euromedia)
    EditorsA. Verbraeck
    Place of PublicationSan Diego
    PublisherSociety for Computer Simulation
    Pages180-187
    Number of pages8
    ISBN (Print)1-56555-102-8
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 1996

    Keywords

    • CAES-PS: Pervasive Systems
    • CAES-EEA: Efficient Embedded Architectures

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Survey of electronic payment methods and systems'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Havinga, P. J. M., Smit, G. J. M., & Helme, A. (1996). Survey of electronic payment methods and systems. In A. Verbraeck (Ed.), Web technology, new media, communications and telematics theory, methods, tools and applications (Euromedia) (pp. 180-187). San Diego: Society for Computer Simulation.