Switched Transconductor Mixer Compatible with Future CMOS

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademic

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Abstract

Mixers are commonly used in communication systems for frequency translation, and usually exploit switching in some form to implement multiplication by a square wave. However, at the low supply voltages required for new CMOS technologies, switches are non- or poorly conducting in the "middle voltage range" between the supply voltages. To solve this problem, gates are often driven outside the supply voltage range, but this results in gate-oxide reliability problems, especially in future technologies with very thin oxides. We propose a new CMOS mixer topology that can operate at low supply voltages, without driving gates outside the supply range. It exploits only switches connected to the supplies, just as in digital CMOS inverters. Mixing is achieved exploiting two cross-coupled transconductors, which are alternatingly activated and de-activated by the switches. A down conversion mixer prototype with 12 dB conversion gain was designed and realized in standard 0.18μm CMOS. It achieves satisfactory mixer performance up to 4GHz, at a supply voltage of 1 Volt. Moreover, the mixer topology features a fundamental high frequency noise figure benefit.
Original languageUndefined
Title of host publicationthe 14th ProRisc workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing (ProRisc 2003)
Place of PublicationUtrecht
PublisherSTW
Pages202-206
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)90-73461-39-1
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2003
Event14th ProRISC Workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing 2003 - Veldhoven, Netherlands
Duration: 25 Nov 200327 Nov 2003
Conference number: 14

Publication series

Name
PublisherSTW Technology Foundation

Workshop

Workshop14th ProRISC Workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing 2003
Abbreviated titleProRISC
CountryNetherlands
CityVeldhoven
Period25/11/0327/11/03

Keywords

  • receiver
  • EWI-14443
  • METIS-213458
  • IR-67445
  • CMOS
  • Mixers
  • low voltage design
  • communication circuits
  • transconductor

Cite this

Klumperink, E. A. M., Louwsma, S. M., Wienk, G. J. M., & Nauta, B. (2003). Switched Transconductor Mixer Compatible with Future CMOS. In the 14th ProRisc workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing (ProRisc 2003) (pp. 202-206). Utrecht: STW.
Klumperink, Eric A.M. ; Louwsma, S.M. ; Wienk, Gerhardus J.M. ; Nauta, Bram. / Switched Transconductor Mixer Compatible with Future CMOS. the 14th ProRisc workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing (ProRisc 2003). Utrecht : STW, 2003. pp. 202-206
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title = "Switched Transconductor Mixer Compatible with Future CMOS",
abstract = "Mixers are commonly used in communication systems for frequency translation, and usually exploit switching in some form to implement multiplication by a square wave. However, at the low supply voltages required for new CMOS technologies, switches are non- or poorly conducting in the {"}middle voltage range{"} between the supply voltages. To solve this problem, gates are often driven outside the supply voltage range, but this results in gate-oxide reliability problems, especially in future technologies with very thin oxides. We propose a new CMOS mixer topology that can operate at low supply voltages, without driving gates outside the supply range. It exploits only switches connected to the supplies, just as in digital CMOS inverters. Mixing is achieved exploiting two cross-coupled transconductors, which are alternatingly activated and de-activated by the switches. A down conversion mixer prototype with 12 dB conversion gain was designed and realized in standard 0.18μm CMOS. It achieves satisfactory mixer performance up to 4GHz, at a supply voltage of 1 Volt. Moreover, the mixer topology features a fundamental high frequency noise figure benefit.",
keywords = "receiver, EWI-14443, METIS-213458, IR-67445, CMOS, Mixers, low voltage design, communication circuits, transconductor",
author = "Klumperink, {Eric A.M.} and S.M. Louwsma and Wienk, {Gerhardus J.M.} and Bram Nauta",
year = "2003",
month = "11",
language = "Undefined",
isbn = "90-73461-39-1",
publisher = "STW",
pages = "202--206",
booktitle = "the 14th ProRisc workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing (ProRisc 2003)",

}

Klumperink, EAM, Louwsma, SM, Wienk, GJM & Nauta, B 2003, Switched Transconductor Mixer Compatible with Future CMOS. in the 14th ProRisc workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing (ProRisc 2003). STW, Utrecht, pp. 202-206, 14th ProRISC Workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing 2003, Veldhoven, Netherlands, 25/11/03.

Switched Transconductor Mixer Compatible with Future CMOS. / Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Louwsma, S.M.; Wienk, Gerhardus J.M.; Nauta, Bram.

the 14th ProRisc workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing (ProRisc 2003). Utrecht : STW, 2003. p. 202-206.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademic

TY - GEN

T1 - Switched Transconductor Mixer Compatible with Future CMOS

AU - Klumperink, Eric A.M.

AU - Louwsma, S.M.

AU - Wienk, Gerhardus J.M.

AU - Nauta, Bram

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Y1 - 2003/11

N2 - Mixers are commonly used in communication systems for frequency translation, and usually exploit switching in some form to implement multiplication by a square wave. However, at the low supply voltages required for new CMOS technologies, switches are non- or poorly conducting in the "middle voltage range" between the supply voltages. To solve this problem, gates are often driven outside the supply voltage range, but this results in gate-oxide reliability problems, especially in future technologies with very thin oxides. We propose a new CMOS mixer topology that can operate at low supply voltages, without driving gates outside the supply range. It exploits only switches connected to the supplies, just as in digital CMOS inverters. Mixing is achieved exploiting two cross-coupled transconductors, which are alternatingly activated and de-activated by the switches. A down conversion mixer prototype with 12 dB conversion gain was designed and realized in standard 0.18μm CMOS. It achieves satisfactory mixer performance up to 4GHz, at a supply voltage of 1 Volt. Moreover, the mixer topology features a fundamental high frequency noise figure benefit.

AB - Mixers are commonly used in communication systems for frequency translation, and usually exploit switching in some form to implement multiplication by a square wave. However, at the low supply voltages required for new CMOS technologies, switches are non- or poorly conducting in the "middle voltage range" between the supply voltages. To solve this problem, gates are often driven outside the supply voltage range, but this results in gate-oxide reliability problems, especially in future technologies with very thin oxides. We propose a new CMOS mixer topology that can operate at low supply voltages, without driving gates outside the supply range. It exploits only switches connected to the supplies, just as in digital CMOS inverters. Mixing is achieved exploiting two cross-coupled transconductors, which are alternatingly activated and de-activated by the switches. A down conversion mixer prototype with 12 dB conversion gain was designed and realized in standard 0.18μm CMOS. It achieves satisfactory mixer performance up to 4GHz, at a supply voltage of 1 Volt. Moreover, the mixer topology features a fundamental high frequency noise figure benefit.

KW - receiver

KW - EWI-14443

KW - METIS-213458

KW - IR-67445

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KW - communication circuits

KW - transconductor

M3 - Conference contribution

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BT - the 14th ProRisc workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing (ProRisc 2003)

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Klumperink EAM, Louwsma SM, Wienk GJM, Nauta B. Switched Transconductor Mixer Compatible with Future CMOS. In the 14th ProRisc workshop on Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing (ProRisc 2003). Utrecht: STW. 2003. p. 202-206