Systematic Description of Sensors

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterProfessional

Abstract

A sensor performs the exchange of information (thus energy) from one domain to another and therefore it operates on the interface between different physical domains. Several frameworks have been developed for a systematic description of sensors. Basically, they are based on either of two different approaches. The first method follows a categorization on the basis of the various energy domains. However, there is no clear definition of an energy domain, leaving room for different opinions on this description. The other approach is based on a categorization of physical quantities. Although more fundamental, this method also leaves scope for discussions. Obviously, the two approaches are connected to each other, since quantities describe particular phenomena in which energy or conversion of energy is involved.
Original languageUndefined
Title of host publicationHandbook of Measuring Systems Design
EditorsPeter H. Sydenham, Richard Thorn
Place of PublicationMalden, MA, USA
PublisherWiley
Pages751-757
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)978-0-47149-7394
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2005

Publication series

Name1 t/m 3
PublisherWiley
Number112
Volume3

Keywords

  • METIS-228738
  • EWI-19499
  • IR-75939

Cite this

Regtien, P. P. L. (2005). Systematic Description of Sensors. In P. H. Sydenham, & R. Thorn (Eds.), Handbook of Measuring Systems Design (pp. 751-757). (1 t/m 3; Vol. 3, No. 112). Malden, MA, USA: Wiley. https://doi.org/10.1002/0471497398.mm373
Regtien, Paulus P.L. / Systematic Description of Sensors. Handbook of Measuring Systems Design. editor / Peter H. Sydenham ; Richard Thorn. Malden, MA, USA : Wiley, 2005. pp. 751-757 (1 t/m 3; 112).
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Regtien, PPL 2005, Systematic Description of Sensors. in PH Sydenham & R Thorn (eds), Handbook of Measuring Systems Design. 1 t/m 3, no. 112, vol. 3, Wiley, Malden, MA, USA, pp. 751-757. https://doi.org/10.1002/0471497398.mm373

Systematic Description of Sensors. / Regtien, Paulus P.L.

Handbook of Measuring Systems Design. ed. / Peter H. Sydenham; Richard Thorn. Malden, MA, USA : Wiley, 2005. p. 751-757 (1 t/m 3; Vol. 3, No. 112).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterProfessional

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Regtien PPL. Systematic Description of Sensors. In Sydenham PH, Thorn R, editors, Handbook of Measuring Systems Design. Malden, MA, USA: Wiley. 2005. p. 751-757. (1 t/m 3; 112). https://doi.org/10.1002/0471497398.mm373