Tenure security as a predictor of housing investment in low-income settlements: Testing a tripartite model

Jean Louis Van Gelder, Eva C. Luciano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tenure security is widely believed to contribute to low-income settlement development by encouraging investment in housing improvement. However, in spite of consensus about its importance, it is still unclear what tenure security exactly entails and few studies have examined how it relates to housing improvement. Using survey data from six informal neighborhoods in Buenos Aires, Argentina, we empirically test a model that specifies how the different types of tenure security that feature in academic and policy debates relate to each other, and the extent to which each predicts investment in housing improvement. We find that legal tenure security and de facto security of tenure influence investment in part through increases in perceptions of tenure security. We conclude that the hypothesized model accurately predicts investment in housing improvement and discuss how these findings inform current debates on tenure security and informality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-500
Number of pages16
JournalEnvironment and Planning A
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

low income
housing
income
Argentina
housing improvement

Keywords

  • Housing
  • Informality
  • Property rights
  • Self-help settlements
  • Slums
  • Tenure security

Cite this

@article{ca1562f380884ac38eae7a154ce8f59a,
title = "Tenure security as a predictor of housing investment in low-income settlements: Testing a tripartite model",
abstract = "Tenure security is widely believed to contribute to low-income settlement development by encouraging investment in housing improvement. However, in spite of consensus about its importance, it is still unclear what tenure security exactly entails and few studies have examined how it relates to housing improvement. Using survey data from six informal neighborhoods in Buenos Aires, Argentina, we empirically test a model that specifies how the different types of tenure security that feature in academic and policy debates relate to each other, and the extent to which each predicts investment in housing improvement. We find that legal tenure security and de facto security of tenure influence investment in part through increases in perceptions of tenure security. We conclude that the hypothesized model accurately predicts investment in housing improvement and discuss how these findings inform current debates on tenure security and informality.",
keywords = "Housing, Informality, Property rights, Self-help settlements, Slums, Tenure security",
author = "{Van Gelder}, {Jean Louis} and Luciano, {Eva C.}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1068/a130151p",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "485--500",
journal = "Environment and Planning A",
issn = "0308-518X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "2",

}

Tenure security as a predictor of housing investment in low-income settlements : Testing a tripartite model. / Van Gelder, Jean Louis; Luciano, Eva C.

In: Environment and Planning A, Vol. 47, No. 2, 2015, p. 485-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tenure security as a predictor of housing investment in low-income settlements

T2 - Testing a tripartite model

AU - Van Gelder, Jean Louis

AU - Luciano, Eva C.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Tenure security is widely believed to contribute to low-income settlement development by encouraging investment in housing improvement. However, in spite of consensus about its importance, it is still unclear what tenure security exactly entails and few studies have examined how it relates to housing improvement. Using survey data from six informal neighborhoods in Buenos Aires, Argentina, we empirically test a model that specifies how the different types of tenure security that feature in academic and policy debates relate to each other, and the extent to which each predicts investment in housing improvement. We find that legal tenure security and de facto security of tenure influence investment in part through increases in perceptions of tenure security. We conclude that the hypothesized model accurately predicts investment in housing improvement and discuss how these findings inform current debates on tenure security and informality.

AB - Tenure security is widely believed to contribute to low-income settlement development by encouraging investment in housing improvement. However, in spite of consensus about its importance, it is still unclear what tenure security exactly entails and few studies have examined how it relates to housing improvement. Using survey data from six informal neighborhoods in Buenos Aires, Argentina, we empirically test a model that specifies how the different types of tenure security that feature in academic and policy debates relate to each other, and the extent to which each predicts investment in housing improvement. We find that legal tenure security and de facto security of tenure influence investment in part through increases in perceptions of tenure security. We conclude that the hypothesized model accurately predicts investment in housing improvement and discuss how these findings inform current debates on tenure security and informality.

KW - Housing

KW - Informality

KW - Property rights

KW - Self-help settlements

KW - Slums

KW - Tenure security

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84924236763&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1068/a130151p

DO - 10.1068/a130151p

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 485

EP - 500

JO - Environment and Planning A

JF - Environment and Planning A

SN - 0308-518X

IS - 2

ER -