The Bologna Process as Alpha or Omega, or, on Interpreting History and Context as Inputs to Bologna, Prague, Berlin and Beyond

Guy Neave

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Not so long ago, in a fit of misplaced enthusiasm, a good colleague mischievously claimed that more studies had been made on Bologna than on the Great Napoleon. As a scientific observation, it was neither plausible nor credible. However, it served a more latent purpose and it served it well: it caused many somnolent experts to surface from a deep – but mercifully not terminal – torpor. Happily, our optimist was not a historian, though to offset this lacuna one has to admit the individual concerned was extraordinarily well versed in the arcana of the Bologna process and perhaps for that very reason, had never heard of Herr Friedrich Kircheisen. In the earlier part of the previous century, Herr Kircheisen was one of Germany’s leading spirits in Napoleoniana and a regular contributor to the Bibliographie napoléonienne, a semi-hagiographical ongoing work of reference, which first appeared in the France of 1902. It continued over the subsequent years right up to the start of the Great War. Through this work of incomparable erudition, Herr Kircheisen and his French colleagues set themselves the stupendous task of cataloguing all that had been written on the Corsican Ogre. And indeed, the imperial score was impressive.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationEuropean Integration and the Governance of Higher Education and Research
    EditorsAlberto Amaral, Guy Neave, Christine Musselin, Peter Maassen
    Place of PublicationDordrecht
    PublisherSpringer
    Pages17-58
    Number of pages309
    ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4020-9505-4
    ISBN (Print)978-1-4020-9504-7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

    Publication series

    NameHigher Education Dynamics
    PublisherSpringer
    Volume26
    ISSN (Print)1571-0378

    Keywords

    • METIS-260622
    • High Education
    • Productive Time
    • High Education System
    • Student Mobility
    • High Education Policy

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  • Cite this

    Neave, G. (2009). The Bologna Process as Alpha or Omega, or, on Interpreting History and Context as Inputs to Bologna, Prague, Berlin and Beyond. In A. Amaral, G. Neave, C. Musselin, & P. Maassen (Eds.), European Integration and the Governance of Higher Education and Research (pp. 17-58). (Higher Education Dynamics; Vol. 26). Dordrecht: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9505-4_2