The Compoundness and Sequentiality of Digital Inequality

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Abstract

Through a survey with a representative sample of Dutch Internet users, this article examines compound digital exclusion: whether a person who lacks a particular digital skill also lacks another kind of skill, whether a person who does not engage in a particular way online is also less likely to engage in other ways, and whether a person who does not achieve a certain outcome online is also less likely to achieve another type of outcome. We also tested sequential digital exclusion: whether a lower level of digital skills leads to lower levels of engagement with the Internet, resulting in a lower likelihood for an individual to achieve tangible outcomes. Both types of digital exclusion are a reality. Certain use can have a strong relation with an outcome in a different domain. Furthermore, those who achieve outcomes in one domain do not necessarily achieve outcomes in another domain. To get a comprehensive picture of the nature of digital exclusion, it is necessary to account for different domains in research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)452-473
JournalInternational journal of communication
Volume11
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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exclusion
Internet
human being
lack

Keywords

  • METIS-321628
  • IR-103639

Cite this

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The Compoundness and Sequentiality of Digital Inequality. / van Deursen, Alexander Johannes Aloysius Maria; Helsper, Ellen; Eynon, Rebecca; van Dijk, Johannes A.G.M.

In: International journal of communication, Vol. 11, 2017, p. 452-473.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Compoundness and Sequentiality of Digital Inequality

AU - van Deursen, Alexander Johannes Aloysius Maria

AU - Helsper, Ellen

AU - Eynon, Rebecca

AU - van Dijk, Johannes A.G.M.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

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AB - Through a survey with a representative sample of Dutch Internet users, this article examines compound digital exclusion: whether a person who lacks a particular digital skill also lacks another kind of skill, whether a person who does not engage in a particular way online is also less likely to engage in other ways, and whether a person who does not achieve a certain outcome online is also less likely to achieve another type of outcome. We also tested sequential digital exclusion: whether a lower level of digital skills leads to lower levels of engagement with the Internet, resulting in a lower likelihood for an individual to achieve tangible outcomes. Both types of digital exclusion are a reality. Certain use can have a strong relation with an outcome in a different domain. Furthermore, those who achieve outcomes in one domain do not necessarily achieve outcomes in another domain. To get a comprehensive picture of the nature of digital exclusion, it is necessary to account for different domains in research.

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KW - IR-103639

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JF - International journal of communication

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