The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface

Daan Waanders (Corresponding Author), Dennis Janssen, Kenneth A. Mann, Nico Verdonschot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cement–bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement–bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect the mechanical response of the cement–bone interface at various load levels in terms of plastic displacement and crack formation. Two FEA models were created, which were based on micro-computed tomography data of two physical cement–bone interface specimens. These models were subjected to tensile fatigue loads with four different magnitudes. Three deformation modes of the cement were considered: ‘only creep’, ‘only damage’ or ‘creep and damage’. The interfacial plastic deformation, the crack reduction as a result of creep and the interfacial stresses in the bone were monitored. The results demonstrate that, although some models failed early, the majority of plastic displacement was caused by fatigue damage, rather than cement creep. However, cement creep does decrease the crack formation in the cement up to 20%. Finally, while cement creep hardly influences the stress levels in the bone, fatigue damage of the cement considerably increases the stress levels in the bone. We conclude that at low load levels the plastic displacement is mainly caused by creep. At moderate to high load levels, however, the plastic displacement is dominated by fatigue damage and is hardly affected by creep, although creep reduced the number of cracks in moderate to high load region
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3028-3034
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of biomechanics
Volume43
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Bone cement
Bone Cements
Micromechanics
Fatigue damage
Fatigue
Cements
Creep
Plastics
Bone and Bones
Bone
Crack initiation
Fatigue of materials
Cracks
Tomography
Microcracks
Plastic deformation

Keywords

  • METIS-272252

Cite this

Waanders, Daan ; Janssen, Dennis ; Mann, Kenneth A. ; Verdonschot, Nico. / The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface. In: Journal of biomechanics. 2010 ; Vol. 43, No. 15. pp. 3028-3034.
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abstract = "The cement–bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement–bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect the mechanical response of the cement–bone interface at various load levels in terms of plastic displacement and crack formation. Two FEA models were created, which were based on micro-computed tomography data of two physical cement–bone interface specimens. These models were subjected to tensile fatigue loads with four different magnitudes. Three deformation modes of the cement were considered: ‘only creep’, ‘only damage’ or ‘creep and damage’. The interfacial plastic deformation, the crack reduction as a result of creep and the interfacial stresses in the bone were monitored. The results demonstrate that, although some models failed early, the majority of plastic displacement was caused by fatigue damage, rather than cement creep. However, cement creep does decrease the crack formation in the cement up to 20{\%}. Finally, while cement creep hardly influences the stress levels in the bone, fatigue damage of the cement considerably increases the stress levels in the bone. We conclude that at low load levels the plastic displacement is mainly caused by creep. At moderate to high load levels, however, the plastic displacement is dominated by fatigue damage and is hardly affected by creep, although creep reduced the number of cracks in moderate to high load region",
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The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface. / Waanders, Daan (Corresponding Author); Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico.

In: Journal of biomechanics, Vol. 43, No. 15, 2010, p. 3028-3034.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface

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AU - Mann, Kenneth A.

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PY - 2010

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N2 - The cement–bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement–bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect the mechanical response of the cement–bone interface at various load levels in terms of plastic displacement and crack formation. Two FEA models were created, which were based on micro-computed tomography data of two physical cement–bone interface specimens. These models were subjected to tensile fatigue loads with four different magnitudes. Three deformation modes of the cement were considered: ‘only creep’, ‘only damage’ or ‘creep and damage’. The interfacial plastic deformation, the crack reduction as a result of creep and the interfacial stresses in the bone were monitored. The results demonstrate that, although some models failed early, the majority of plastic displacement was caused by fatigue damage, rather than cement creep. However, cement creep does decrease the crack formation in the cement up to 20%. Finally, while cement creep hardly influences the stress levels in the bone, fatigue damage of the cement considerably increases the stress levels in the bone. We conclude that at low load levels the plastic displacement is mainly caused by creep. At moderate to high load levels, however, the plastic displacement is dominated by fatigue damage and is hardly affected by creep, although creep reduced the number of cracks in moderate to high load region

AB - The cement–bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement–bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect the mechanical response of the cement–bone interface at various load levels in terms of plastic displacement and crack formation. Two FEA models were created, which were based on micro-computed tomography data of two physical cement–bone interface specimens. These models were subjected to tensile fatigue loads with four different magnitudes. Three deformation modes of the cement were considered: ‘only creep’, ‘only damage’ or ‘creep and damage’. The interfacial plastic deformation, the crack reduction as a result of creep and the interfacial stresses in the bone were monitored. The results demonstrate that, although some models failed early, the majority of plastic displacement was caused by fatigue damage, rather than cement creep. However, cement creep does decrease the crack formation in the cement up to 20%. Finally, while cement creep hardly influences the stress levels in the bone, fatigue damage of the cement considerably increases the stress levels in the bone. We conclude that at low load levels the plastic displacement is mainly caused by creep. At moderate to high load levels, however, the plastic displacement is dominated by fatigue damage and is hardly affected by creep, although creep reduced the number of cracks in moderate to high load region

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