The factor structure of the Forms of Self-Criticising/Attacking & Self-Reassuring Scale in Thirteen Distinct Populations

Júlia Halamová (Corresponding Author), Martin Kanovský, Paul Gilbert, Nicholas A. Troop, David C. Zuroff, Nicola Hermanto, Nicola Petrocchi, Maria Petronella Johanna Sommers-Spijkerman, James N. Kirby, Ben Shahar, Tobias Krieger, Marcela Matos, Kenichi Asano, FuYa Yu, Jaskaran Basran, Nuriye Kupeli (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

There is considerable evidence that self-criticism plays a major role in the vulnerability to and recovery from psychopathology. Methods to measure this process, and its change over time, are therefore important for research in psychopathology and wellbeing. This study examined the factor structure of a widely used measure, the Forms of Self-Criticising/Attacking & Self-Reassuring Scale in thirteen nonclinical samples (N = 7510) from twelve different countries: Australia (N = 319), Canada (N = 383), Switzerland (N = 230), Israel (N = 476), Italy (N = 389), Japan (N = 264), the Netherlands (N = 360), Portugal (N = 764), Slovakia (N = 1326), Taiwan (N = 417), the United Kingdom 1 (N = 1570), the United Kingdom 2 (N = 883), and USA (N = 331). This study used more advanced analyses than prior reports: a bifactor item-response theory model, a two-tier itemresponse theory model, and a non-parametric item-response theory (Mokken) scale analysis. Although the original three-factor solution for the FSCRS (distinguishing between Inadequate-Self, Hated-Self, and Reassured-Self) had an acceptable fit, two-tier models, with two general factors (Self-criticism and Self-reassurance) demonstrated the best fit across all samples. This study provides preliminary evidence suggesting that this two-factor structure can be used in a range of nonclinical contexts across countries and cultures. Inadequate-Self and Hated-Self might not by distinct factors in nonclinical samples. Future work may benefit from distinguishing between self-correction versus shame-based self-criticism.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of psychopathology and behavioral assessment
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jun 2018

Keywords

  • UT-Hybrid-D
  • Self-criticism
  • Self-reassurance, Bifactor models
  • Two-tier model
  • Self-reassurance
  • Bifactor models
  • Cross-cultural studies

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