The first evaluation of a Mobile application to encourage social participation for community-dwelling older adults

S. M. Jansen-Kosterink*, J. Bergsma, A. Francissen, A. Naafs

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Both loneliness and social isolation are linked to numerous negative health outcomes and there is no one-size-fits-all solution to reduce that loneliness and social isolation. Therefore, a new social technology (mobile application) which encourages social participation for community-dwelling older adults was developed and deployed. The objective of this study was to assess the usability, end-user experience, and potential added value of this mobile application among community-dwelling older adults. After recruitment and after the weeks of use participants were asked to complete a range of questionnaires, and log-data was gathered to provide information on actual use. Of the 91 older adults who started using the mobile application 41 (80% female, age 73.4 years (SD 7.8)) were willing to participate in this study. On average the application was used for 11 weeks. The usability was acceptable (SUS score of 65.3 (SD18.0)) and 59% of the participants were willing to continue using the application. To conclude, the mobile application to encourage social participation was accepted by community-dwelling older adults and the measured change in quality of life was positive and clinically meaningful. After improving the technology a next step is to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1107-1113
Number of pages7
JournalHealth and technology
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Community-dwelling older adults
  • Evaluation
  • Loneliness
  • Mobile application
  • Social isolation

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