The G1000 Firework Dialogue as a Social Learning System: A Community of Practice Approach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

New public governance studies have increasingly sought to highlight the importance of citizen engagement in local decision-making processes as a way to identify suitable approaches to matters of public concern. There is a particular absence of good theoretical development building upon empirical work exploring citizen participatory processes as potential sites for social learning. In this paper, we asked the overall research question of the extent to which a new citizen participation process can be designed as a social learning system to facilitate the integration of citizen types of interests and knowledge in local decision-making. To answer this question, the study’s results provided deeper insights into the internal social learning dynamics within one particular deliberately designed collective local decision-making process, the G1000 firework dialogue in Enschede, The Netherlands. Using Wenger’s concept of “communities of practice” (CoP) as a baseline for analysis, the results of this study indicated that the G1000 firework dialogue process encouraged the creation of activities that may be considered to correspond to the different structural dimensions of CoP and that new design-based models of citizen participation would benefit from adopting a more explicit incorporation of and orientation towards social learning practices and theories. Consequently, we argue that local governance should invest more in citizen participation processes that encourage and enable learning among different societal stakeholders with different interests through constructive dialogues over political matters.
LanguageEnglish
Article number129
JournalSocial Sciences
Volume7
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Aug 2018

Fingerprint

social learning
citizens' participation
dialogue
citizen
decision-making process
community
governance
Netherlands
stakeholder
decision making
learning

Keywords

  • social learning systems
  • communities of practice
  • common ground formation
  • participatory decision-making processes
  • participatory local governance
  • G1000

Cite this

@article{8849a79ce8d94be682e69990d164b921,
title = "The G1000 Firework Dialogue as a Social Learning System: A Community of Practice Approach",
abstract = "New public governance studies have increasingly sought to highlight the importance of citizen engagement in local decision-making processes as a way to identify suitable approaches to matters of public concern. There is a particular absence of good theoretical development building upon empirical work exploring citizen participatory processes as potential sites for social learning. In this paper, we asked the overall research question of the extent to which a new citizen participation process can be designed as a social learning system to facilitate the integration of citizen types of interests and knowledge in local decision-making. To answer this question, the study’s results provided deeper insights into the internal social learning dynamics within one particular deliberately designed collective local decision-making process, the G1000 firework dialogue in Enschede, The Netherlands. Using Wenger’s concept of “communities of practice” (CoP) as a baseline for analysis, the results of this study indicated that the G1000 firework dialogue process encouraged the creation of activities that may be considered to correspond to the different structural dimensions of CoP and that new design-based models of citizen participation would benefit from adopting a more explicit incorporation of and orientation towards social learning practices and theories. Consequently, we argue that local governance should invest more in citizen participation processes that encourage and enable learning among different societal stakeholders with different interests through constructive dialogues over political matters.",
keywords = "social learning systems, communities of practice, common ground formation, participatory decision-making processes, participatory local governance, G1000",
author = "Franziska Eckardt and Benneworth, {Paul Stephen}",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "5",
doi = "10.3390/socsci7080129",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "Social Sciences",
issn = "2076-0760",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The G1000 Firework Dialogue as a Social Learning System: A Community of Practice Approach

AU - Eckardt,Franziska

AU - Benneworth,Paul Stephen

PY - 2018/8/5

Y1 - 2018/8/5

N2 - New public governance studies have increasingly sought to highlight the importance of citizen engagement in local decision-making processes as a way to identify suitable approaches to matters of public concern. There is a particular absence of good theoretical development building upon empirical work exploring citizen participatory processes as potential sites for social learning. In this paper, we asked the overall research question of the extent to which a new citizen participation process can be designed as a social learning system to facilitate the integration of citizen types of interests and knowledge in local decision-making. To answer this question, the study’s results provided deeper insights into the internal social learning dynamics within one particular deliberately designed collective local decision-making process, the G1000 firework dialogue in Enschede, The Netherlands. Using Wenger’s concept of “communities of practice” (CoP) as a baseline for analysis, the results of this study indicated that the G1000 firework dialogue process encouraged the creation of activities that may be considered to correspond to the different structural dimensions of CoP and that new design-based models of citizen participation would benefit from adopting a more explicit incorporation of and orientation towards social learning practices and theories. Consequently, we argue that local governance should invest more in citizen participation processes that encourage and enable learning among different societal stakeholders with different interests through constructive dialogues over political matters.

AB - New public governance studies have increasingly sought to highlight the importance of citizen engagement in local decision-making processes as a way to identify suitable approaches to matters of public concern. There is a particular absence of good theoretical development building upon empirical work exploring citizen participatory processes as potential sites for social learning. In this paper, we asked the overall research question of the extent to which a new citizen participation process can be designed as a social learning system to facilitate the integration of citizen types of interests and knowledge in local decision-making. To answer this question, the study’s results provided deeper insights into the internal social learning dynamics within one particular deliberately designed collective local decision-making process, the G1000 firework dialogue in Enschede, The Netherlands. Using Wenger’s concept of “communities of practice” (CoP) as a baseline for analysis, the results of this study indicated that the G1000 firework dialogue process encouraged the creation of activities that may be considered to correspond to the different structural dimensions of CoP and that new design-based models of citizen participation would benefit from adopting a more explicit incorporation of and orientation towards social learning practices and theories. Consequently, we argue that local governance should invest more in citizen participation processes that encourage and enable learning among different societal stakeholders with different interests through constructive dialogues over political matters.

KW - social learning systems

KW - communities of practice

KW - common ground formation

KW - participatory decision-making processes

KW - participatory local governance

KW - G1000

U2 - 10.3390/socsci7080129

DO - 10.3390/socsci7080129

M3 - Article

VL - 7

JO - Social Sciences

T2 - Social Sciences

JF - Social Sciences

SN - 2076-0760

IS - 8

M1 - 129

ER -