The influence of surface texturing on the frictional behaviour in starved lubricated parallel sliding contacts

Dariush Bijani*, Elena L. Deladi, Matthijn B. de Rooij, Dirk J. Schipper

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)
    17 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Starvation occurs when the lubricated contact uses up the lubricant supply, and there is not enough lubricant in the contact to support the separation between solid surfaces. On the other hand, the use of textures on surfaces in lubricated contacts can result in a higher film thickness. In addition, a modification of the surface's geometrical parameters can benefit the tribological behaviour of the contacts. In this article, for parallel sliding surfaces in starved lubricated conditions, the effect of surface texturing upon the coefficient of friction is investigated. It is shown that surface texturing may improve film formation under the conditions of starvation, and as a result, the frictional behaviour of the parallel sliding contact. Furthermore, the effect of starved lubrication on textured surfaces with different patterns in the presence of a cavitation effect, and its influence on frictional behaviour, is investigated. It is shown that surface texturing can reduce the coefficient of friction, and that under certain conditions, the texturing parameter could have an influence on the frictional behaviour of parallel sliding contacts in the starved lubrication regime.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number68
    JournalLubricants
    Volume7
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 9 Aug 2019

    Keywords

    • Deterministic asperity model
    • Film thickness
    • Mixed lubrication
    • Numerical modelling
    • Starvation
    • Surface texturing
    • Texturing patterns

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