The modality and redundancy effects in multimedia learning in children with dyslexia

Carolien A.N. Knoop-van Campen (Corresponding Author), Eliane Segers, Ludo Verhoeven

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
93 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The present study aimed to examine the modality and redundancy effects in multimedia learning in children with dyslexia in order to find out whether their learning benefits from written and/or spoken text with pictures. We compared study time and knowledge gain in 26 11-year-old children with dyslexia and 38 typically reading peers in a within-subjects design. All children were presented with a series of user-paced multimedia lessons in 3 conditions: pictorial information presented with (a) written text, (b) audio, or (c) combined text and audio. We also examined whether children's learning outcomes were related to their working memory. With respect to study time, we found modality and reversed redundancy effects. Children with dyslexia spent more time learning in the text condition, compared with the audio condition and the combined text-and-audio condition. Regarding knowledge gain, no modality or redundancy effects were evidenced. Although the groups differed on working memory, it did not influence the modality or redundancy effect on study time or knowledge gain. In multimedia learning, it thus is more efficient to provide children with dyslexia with audio or with auditory support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)140-155
Number of pages16
JournalDyslexia
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

Fingerprint

Dyslexia
Multimedia
dyslexia
redundancy
multimedia
Learning
learning
Short-Term Memory
Reading
time
Group

Keywords

  • UT-Hybrid-D
  • Modality effect
  • Multimedia learning
  • Redundancy effect
  • Working memory
  • Dyslexia

Cite this

Knoop-van Campen, Carolien A.N. ; Segers, Eliane ; Verhoeven, Ludo. / The modality and redundancy effects in multimedia learning in children with dyslexia. In: Dyslexia. 2018 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 140-155.
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The modality and redundancy effects in multimedia learning in children with dyslexia. / Knoop-van Campen, Carolien A.N. (Corresponding Author); Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo.

In: Dyslexia, Vol. 24, No. 2, 05.2018, p. 140-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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