The natural history of rheumatoid arthritis over 20 years: Clinical symptoms, radiological signs, treatment, mortality and prognostic significance of early features

J.J. Rasker* (Corresponding Author), J.A. Cosh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

42 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

A 20 year follow up is reported on 100 patients with definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis when they were all initially seen within one year of the onset of arthritis. Forty-six patients have died and in 17 death was due to or related to RA. Mortality was greater in men than in women and in patients who had classical rather than definite RA at one year. Thirty of the surviving 54 patients have either no or only moderate restriction of physical activity. Those who had definite RA at one year are now better as regards functional capacity and joint score than those who had classical RA. In general the titre of the Rose test has tended to fall and those who have become seronegative have done better than those remaining seropositive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-11
Number of pages7
JournalClinical rheumatology
Volume6
Issue number2 Supplement
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 1987
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Natural History
  • Prognostic Features
  • Rheumatoid Artritis

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