The planning illusion: Does active planning of a learning route support learning as well as learners think it does?

W.J. Bonestroo, Ton de Jong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Is actively planning one’s learning route through a learning domain beneficial for learning? Moreover, can learners accurately judge the extent to which planning has been beneficial for them? This study examined the effects of active planning on learning. Participants received a tool in which they created a learning route themselves before accessing learning material and, for comparison, also worked with a tool in which the route was planned automatically. Eighty-three participants participated in learning sessions with both tools over two topics in statistics. Both tools were found to influence the learning process. However, results indicate inconsistency between participants’ judgement of the relative effectiveness of the two types of tools and their actual learning outcomes. Although participants thought they had learned more when they actively created a plan themselves, knowledge tests showed no differences on performance between actively planning a learning route or receiving it ready-made
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)559-571
JournalEducational studies
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • METIS-291861
  • IR-83932

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