The PowerGlove: Assessment of hand and finger movements in Parkinson’s disease patients

K.J. van Dijk, R. Verhagen, J.C. van den Noort, L.J. Bour, Petrus H. Veltink, Tjitske Heida

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademic

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    Abstract

    Objective: The aim of the study is to test whether the PowerGlove (PG), an instrumented glove which consists of inertial (accelerometers and gyroscopes) and magnetic sensors, is a valid and reliable instrument to measure different degrees of hand motor impairments in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD).

    Background: Assessment of hand movements is an important part of the motor function section of the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS). Unfortunately, the assessment often varies per physician and is highly dependent on experience. This subjective nature sometimes makes it hard to interpret the UPDRS correctly. Recently, the University of Twente developed the PG which enables accurate and ambulant measurement of hand and finger movements (Fig. 1A)[1]. Application of the PG during the clinical scoring will enable more accurate observation of hand function and quantification of the PD motor symptoms.

    Methods: We plan to include 35 PD patients. We will assess the hand movements of the patients in medication on/off state with the PG during 7 UPDRS items, i.e. tremor at rest, action and postural tremor, finger tapping, rapid opening/closing of the hand, pro/supination of the hand, and wrist rigidity. Sensor units of the PG are attached to the dorsal side of the left hand and on the finger segments of the thumb, index and middle finger. One additional PG sensor is attached to the forearm to measure the wrist angle. A force sensor is used to measure the force which is applied to passively flex the wrist of the patient. Prior to measurement, an anatomical calibration procedure is performed to determine the sensor-to-segment coordinate systems.

    Results: Visual inspection of preliminary results showed there were notable differences in the recorded data within a patient in medication on/off state. Conclusions: The results indicate that the PG enables to quantitatively detect differences in the clinical state of the patient. In the next phase of this study, parameters need to be found which describe the performance of UPDRS tasks and include these in the group analyses of the 35 PD patients.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders 2015
    Place of PublicationMalden
    PublisherWiley
    Pages423
    ISBN (Print)1531-8257
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 12 Jun 2015
    Event19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders 2015 - San Diego, United States
    Duration: 14 Jun 201518 Jun 2015
    Conference number: 19

    Publication series

    NameMovement Disorders
    PublisherWiley
    NumberSupplement
    Volume30
    ISSN (Print)1531-8257

    Conference

    Conference19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders 2015
    CountryUnited States
    CitySan Diego
    Period14/06/1518/06/15

    Fingerprint

    Fingers
    Parkinson Disease
    Hand
    Wrist
    Tremor
    Supination
    Thumb
    Forearm
    Calibration
    Observation
    Physicians

    Keywords

    • Parkinson's Disease
    • symptom quantification
    • IR-100269
    • EWI-26960
    • METIS-316900
    • movement analyses

    Cite this

    van Dijk, K. J., Verhagen, R., van den Noort, J. C., Bour, L. J., Veltink, P. H., & Heida, T. (2015). The PowerGlove: Assessment of hand and finger movements in Parkinson’s disease patients. In 19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders 2015 (pp. 423). (Movement Disorders; Vol. 30, No. Supplement). Malden: Wiley. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26296
    van Dijk, K.J. ; Verhagen, R. ; van den Noort, J.C. ; Bour, L.J. ; Veltink, Petrus H. ; Heida, Tjitske. / The PowerGlove: Assessment of hand and finger movements in Parkinson’s disease patients. 19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders 2015. Malden : Wiley, 2015. pp. 423 (Movement Disorders; Supplement).
    @inproceedings{85254160c32b4568a0c96cda636e4e94,
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    van Dijk, KJ, Verhagen, R, van den Noort, JC, Bour, LJ, Veltink, PH & Heida, T 2015, The PowerGlove: Assessment of hand and finger movements in Parkinson’s disease patients. in 19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders 2015. Movement Disorders, no. Supplement, vol. 30, Wiley, Malden, pp. 423, 19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders 2015, San Diego, United States, 14/06/15. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26296

    The PowerGlove: Assessment of hand and finger movements in Parkinson’s disease patients. / van Dijk, K.J.; Verhagen, R.; van den Noort, J.C.; Bour, L.J.; Veltink, Petrus H.; Heida, Tjitske.

    19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders 2015. Malden : Wiley, 2015. p. 423 (Movement Disorders; Vol. 30, No. Supplement).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademic

    TY - GEN

    T1 - The PowerGlove: Assessment of hand and finger movements in Parkinson’s disease patients

    AU - van Dijk, K.J.

    AU - Verhagen, R.

    AU - van den Noort, J.C.

    AU - Bour, L.J.

    AU - Veltink, Petrus H.

    AU - Heida, Tjitske

    PY - 2015/6/12

    Y1 - 2015/6/12

    N2 - Objective: The aim of the study is to test whether the PowerGlove (PG), an instrumented glove which consists of inertial (accelerometers and gyroscopes) and magnetic sensors, is a valid and reliable instrument to measure different degrees of hand motor impairments in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD).Background: Assessment of hand movements is an important part of the motor function section of the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS). Unfortunately, the assessment often varies per physician and is highly dependent on experience. This subjective nature sometimes makes it hard to interpret the UPDRS correctly. Recently, the University of Twente developed the PG which enables accurate and ambulant measurement of hand and finger movements (Fig. 1A)[1]. Application of the PG during the clinical scoring will enable more accurate observation of hand function and quantification of the PD motor symptoms.Methods: We plan to include 35 PD patients. We will assess the hand movements of the patients in medication on/off state with the PG during 7 UPDRS items, i.e. tremor at rest, action and postural tremor, finger tapping, rapid opening/closing of the hand, pro/supination of the hand, and wrist rigidity. Sensor units of the PG are attached to the dorsal side of the left hand and on the finger segments of the thumb, index and middle finger. One additional PG sensor is attached to the forearm to measure the wrist angle. A force sensor is used to measure the force which is applied to passively flex the wrist of the patient. Prior to measurement, an anatomical calibration procedure is performed to determine the sensor-to-segment coordinate systems.Results: Visual inspection of preliminary results showed there were notable differences in the recorded data within a patient in medication on/off state. Conclusions: The results indicate that the PG enables to quantitatively detect differences in the clinical state of the patient. In the next phase of this study, parameters need to be found which describe the performance of UPDRS tasks and include these in the group analyses of the 35 PD patients.

    AB - Objective: The aim of the study is to test whether the PowerGlove (PG), an instrumented glove which consists of inertial (accelerometers and gyroscopes) and magnetic sensors, is a valid and reliable instrument to measure different degrees of hand motor impairments in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD).Background: Assessment of hand movements is an important part of the motor function section of the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS). Unfortunately, the assessment often varies per physician and is highly dependent on experience. This subjective nature sometimes makes it hard to interpret the UPDRS correctly. Recently, the University of Twente developed the PG which enables accurate and ambulant measurement of hand and finger movements (Fig. 1A)[1]. Application of the PG during the clinical scoring will enable more accurate observation of hand function and quantification of the PD motor symptoms.Methods: We plan to include 35 PD patients. We will assess the hand movements of the patients in medication on/off state with the PG during 7 UPDRS items, i.e. tremor at rest, action and postural tremor, finger tapping, rapid opening/closing of the hand, pro/supination of the hand, and wrist rigidity. Sensor units of the PG are attached to the dorsal side of the left hand and on the finger segments of the thumb, index and middle finger. One additional PG sensor is attached to the forearm to measure the wrist angle. A force sensor is used to measure the force which is applied to passively flex the wrist of the patient. Prior to measurement, an anatomical calibration procedure is performed to determine the sensor-to-segment coordinate systems.Results: Visual inspection of preliminary results showed there were notable differences in the recorded data within a patient in medication on/off state. Conclusions: The results indicate that the PG enables to quantitatively detect differences in the clinical state of the patient. In the next phase of this study, parameters need to be found which describe the performance of UPDRS tasks and include these in the group analyses of the 35 PD patients.

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    KW - IR-100269

    KW - EWI-26960

    KW - METIS-316900

    KW - movement analyses

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    DO - 10.1002/mds.26296

    M3 - Conference contribution

    SN - 1531-8257

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    BT - 19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders 2015

    PB - Wiley

    CY - Malden

    ER -

    van Dijk KJ, Verhagen R, van den Noort JC, Bour LJ, Veltink PH, Heida T. The PowerGlove: Assessment of hand and finger movements in Parkinson’s disease patients. In 19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders 2015. Malden: Wiley. 2015. p. 423. (Movement Disorders; Supplement). https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26296