The relationship between depressive symptoms, general psychopathology, and well-being in patients with major depressive disorder

Annelies Weijers*, Sanne Rasing, Daan Creemers, Ad Vermulst, Arnt F.A. Schellekens, Gerben J. Westerhof

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Objective: In mental health care, treatment effects are commonly monitored by symptom severity measures. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between symptom severity and well-being in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: Adult MDD outpatients (n = 77) were administered the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology—Self-Report (QIDS-SR), the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45), and the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF) before treatment and 6 months later. Results: Symptom severity correlated moderately with well-being at baseline and strongly at follow-up. Reliable change index scores showed improvement on the QIDS-SR, OQ-45, and MHC-SF in 65%, 59%, and 40%, respectively. A quarter of patients improved in symptom severity but not well-being (Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology—Self-Report [IDS-SR]: 25%; OQ-45: 24%). Conclusion: Findings suggest that symptom severity and subjective well-being are related, but distinct concepts. Several reasons for the stronger improvements in symptoms than in well-being are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of clinical psychology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print/First online - 14 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • depression
  • dual continua model
  • Mental Health Continuum-Short Form
  • Routine Outcome Monitoring
  • well-being

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