The role of the motor cortex in essential tremor

Sarvi Sharifi, F. Luft, T. Heida, W. Mugge, A.C. Schouten, L. Bour, A.F. van Rootselaar

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractOther research output

Abstract

Objectives: Essential tremor (ET), the most prevalent hyperkinetic movement disorder, is characterized by an action tremor (4-7 Hz). The role of the sensorimotor cortex in tremor generation is uncertain. Previous corticomuscular coupling studies in ET showed either a cortical drive, an afferent input, or both. In contrast, familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy (FCMTE) with tremulous movements, clinically resembling ET, is characterized by a cortical drive around 15-20Hz.

Methods: Corticomuscular directionality was investigated with renormalized partial directed coherence (rPDC) in ET (n=16), FCMTE (n=7), and healthy controls (HC; n=16). EEG-EMG was recorded during 2 minutes of postural tremor (ET and FCMTE right arm outstretched; HC mimicking tremor ±5Hz), and 1 minute of self-paced slow movements <3Hz (ET and HC).

Results: In ET and HC, predominantly, muscular to cortical directionality was evident around (mimicked) tremor frequency. FCMTE patients revealed a cortical to muscular directionality. During voluntary slow movements, below 3 Hz, corticomuscular coupling was bidirectional in ET and HC.

Conclusions: Our results indicate cortical activity at (mimicked) tremor frequencies resulting from afferent input in ET and HC, instead of a cortical drive. In FCMTE, rPDC was able to confirm a cortical drive tremulous movement frequencies. Furthermore, our findings indicate direct sensorimotor cortex output during slow voluntary movements. Concluding, tremor in ET seems not to result from a direct cortical drive. Subcortical circuits, possibly normally involved in high paced oscillatory movements, seem to be involved in ET.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e128
Number of pages1
JournalParkinsonism & Related Disorders
Volume22
Issue numberSuppl. 2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016
EventXXI World Congress on Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders 2015 - Milan, Italy
Duration: 6 Dec 20159 Dec 2015
Conference number: 21

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Essential Tremor
Motor Cortex
Tremor
Hyperkinesis
Movement Disorders
Electroencephalography

Keywords

  • BSS-Electrical Neurostimulation
  • METIS-320920
  • IR-102657
  • EWI-27534

Cite this

Sharifi, Sarvi ; Luft, F. ; Heida, T. ; Mugge, W. ; Schouten, A.C. ; Bour, L. ; van Rootselaar, A.F. / The role of the motor cortex in essential tremor. In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders. 2016 ; Vol. 22, No. Suppl. 2. pp. e128.
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abstract = "Objectives: Essential tremor (ET), the most prevalent hyperkinetic movement disorder, is characterized by an action tremor (4-7 Hz). The role of the sensorimotor cortex in tremor generation is uncertain. Previous corticomuscular coupling studies in ET showed either a cortical drive, an afferent input, or both. In contrast, familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy (FCMTE) with tremulous movements, clinically resembling ET, is characterized by a cortical drive around 15-20Hz.Methods: Corticomuscular directionality was investigated with renormalized partial directed coherence (rPDC) in ET (n=16), FCMTE (n=7), and healthy controls (HC; n=16). EEG-EMG was recorded during 2 minutes of postural tremor (ET and FCMTE right arm outstretched; HC mimicking tremor ±5Hz), and 1 minute of self-paced slow movements <3Hz (ET and HC).Results: In ET and HC, predominantly, muscular to cortical directionality was evident around (mimicked) tremor frequency. FCMTE patients revealed a cortical to muscular directionality. During voluntary slow movements, below 3 Hz, corticomuscular coupling was bidirectional in ET and HC.Conclusions: Our results indicate cortical activity at (mimicked) tremor frequencies resulting from afferent input in ET and HC, instead of a cortical drive. In FCMTE, rPDC was able to confirm a cortical drive tremulous movement frequencies. Furthermore, our findings indicate direct sensorimotor cortex output during slow voluntary movements. Concluding, tremor in ET seems not to result from a direct cortical drive. Subcortical circuits, possibly normally involved in high paced oscillatory movements, seem to be involved in ET.",
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Sharifi, S, Luft, F, Heida, T, Mugge, W, Schouten, AC, Bour, L & van Rootselaar, AF 2016, 'The role of the motor cortex in essential tremor' Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, vol. 22, no. Suppl. 2, pp. e128. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2015.10.306

The role of the motor cortex in essential tremor. / Sharifi, Sarvi; Luft, F.; Heida, T.; Mugge, W.; Schouten, A.C.; Bour, L.; van Rootselaar, A.F.

In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, Vol. 22, No. Suppl. 2, 01.2016, p. e128.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractOther research output

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of the motor cortex in essential tremor

AU - Sharifi, Sarvi

AU - Luft, F.

AU - Heida, T.

AU - Mugge, W.

AU - Schouten, A.C.

AU - Bour, L.

AU - van Rootselaar, A.F.

PY - 2016/1

Y1 - 2016/1

N2 - Objectives: Essential tremor (ET), the most prevalent hyperkinetic movement disorder, is characterized by an action tremor (4-7 Hz). The role of the sensorimotor cortex in tremor generation is uncertain. Previous corticomuscular coupling studies in ET showed either a cortical drive, an afferent input, or both. In contrast, familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy (FCMTE) with tremulous movements, clinically resembling ET, is characterized by a cortical drive around 15-20Hz.Methods: Corticomuscular directionality was investigated with renormalized partial directed coherence (rPDC) in ET (n=16), FCMTE (n=7), and healthy controls (HC; n=16). EEG-EMG was recorded during 2 minutes of postural tremor (ET and FCMTE right arm outstretched; HC mimicking tremor ±5Hz), and 1 minute of self-paced slow movements <3Hz (ET and HC).Results: In ET and HC, predominantly, muscular to cortical directionality was evident around (mimicked) tremor frequency. FCMTE patients revealed a cortical to muscular directionality. During voluntary slow movements, below 3 Hz, corticomuscular coupling was bidirectional in ET and HC.Conclusions: Our results indicate cortical activity at (mimicked) tremor frequencies resulting from afferent input in ET and HC, instead of a cortical drive. In FCMTE, rPDC was able to confirm a cortical drive tremulous movement frequencies. Furthermore, our findings indicate direct sensorimotor cortex output during slow voluntary movements. Concluding, tremor in ET seems not to result from a direct cortical drive. Subcortical circuits, possibly normally involved in high paced oscillatory movements, seem to be involved in ET.

AB - Objectives: Essential tremor (ET), the most prevalent hyperkinetic movement disorder, is characterized by an action tremor (4-7 Hz). The role of the sensorimotor cortex in tremor generation is uncertain. Previous corticomuscular coupling studies in ET showed either a cortical drive, an afferent input, or both. In contrast, familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy (FCMTE) with tremulous movements, clinically resembling ET, is characterized by a cortical drive around 15-20Hz.Methods: Corticomuscular directionality was investigated with renormalized partial directed coherence (rPDC) in ET (n=16), FCMTE (n=7), and healthy controls (HC; n=16). EEG-EMG was recorded during 2 minutes of postural tremor (ET and FCMTE right arm outstretched; HC mimicking tremor ±5Hz), and 1 minute of self-paced slow movements <3Hz (ET and HC).Results: In ET and HC, predominantly, muscular to cortical directionality was evident around (mimicked) tremor frequency. FCMTE patients revealed a cortical to muscular directionality. During voluntary slow movements, below 3 Hz, corticomuscular coupling was bidirectional in ET and HC.Conclusions: Our results indicate cortical activity at (mimicked) tremor frequencies resulting from afferent input in ET and HC, instead of a cortical drive. In FCMTE, rPDC was able to confirm a cortical drive tremulous movement frequencies. Furthermore, our findings indicate direct sensorimotor cortex output during slow voluntary movements. Concluding, tremor in ET seems not to result from a direct cortical drive. Subcortical circuits, possibly normally involved in high paced oscillatory movements, seem to be involved in ET.

KW - BSS-Electrical Neurostimulation

KW - METIS-320920

KW - IR-102657

KW - EWI-27534

U2 - 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2015.10.306

DO - 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2015.10.306

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 22

SP - e128

JO - Parkinsonism & Related Disorders

JF - Parkinsonism & Related Disorders

SN - 1353-8020

IS - Suppl. 2

ER -