The use of endografts to create an endoluminal femoropopliteal bypass after failed above-knee femoropopliteal open bypass surgery

M. M.A. Lensvelt, O. R.M. Wikkeling, J. A.Van Oostayen, J. G. Roukema, C. J. Zeebregts, M. M.P.J. Reijnen* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Redo femoropopliteal bypass surgery is associated with increased morbidity and related to a poorer outcome than primary procedures. Endografts might provide an alternative, avoiding dissection of a previously operated groin. Patients treated with a polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stents for superficial femoral artery occlusive disease between February 2009 and September 2011 were prospectively gathered. Demographics, clinical status, procedural aspects, and follow-up were retrieved. Seventy-four patients were included of which 5 (7%) were treated before with a femoropopliteal bypass. Indication for intervention was Rutherford category 3 in all patients and the median ankle-brachial index (ABI) was 0.68. Technical success was achieved in all cases. The postoperative course was uneventful in all and the ABI increased to 0.95. After a follow-up period of 18 months, 4 of 5 endografts remained patent. The use of endografts after failed femoropopliteal bypass surgery is feasible and safe and could be used to avoid or minimize a difficult and hazardous dissection of a previously operated area.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)338-341
Number of pages4
JournalVascular and Endovascular Surgery
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • complications
  • endograft
  • femoropopliteal bypass
  • reoperation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The use of endografts to create an endoluminal femoropopliteal bypass after failed above-knee femoropopliteal open bypass surgery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this