The use of near-infrared light for safe and effective visualization of subsurface blood vessels to facilitate blood withdrawal in children

Natascha J. Cuper*, John H.G. Klaessens, Joris E.N. Jaspers, Rowland de Roode, Herke Jan Noordmans, Jurgen C. de Graaff, Rudolf M. Verdaasdonk

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obtaining access to blood vessels can be difficult, especially in children. Visualization of subsurface blood vessels might be a solution. Ultrasound and visible light have been used to this purpose, but have some drawbacks. Near-infrared light might be a better option since subsurface blood vessels can be visualized in high contrast due to less absorption and scattering in tissue as compared to visible light. Our findings with a multispectral imaging system support this theory. A device, the VascuLuminator, was developed, based on transillumination of the puncture site with near-infrared light. The VascuLuminator was designed to meet the requirements of compact and safe use. A phantom study showed that the maximum depth of visibility (5.5. mm for a 3.6. mm blood vessel) is sufficient to visualize blood vessels in typical locations for peripheral venous and arterial access. A quantitative comparison of the VascuLuminator and to two other vessel imaging devices, using reflection of near-infrared light instead of transillumination, was conducted. The VascuLuminator is able to decrease failure at first attempt in blood withdrawal in pediatric patients from 10/80 (13%) to 1/45 (2%; P= .05).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-440
Number of pages8
JournalMedical Engineering and Physics
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Artery
  • Imaging
  • Near-infrared
  • NIR
  • Pediatrics
  • Peripheral catheterization
  • Vein
  • Venipuncture

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The use of near-infrared light for safe and effective visualization of subsurface blood vessels to facilitate blood withdrawal in children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this