The water and land footprints of meat and milk production and consumption in Kenya: implications for sustainability and food security

Caroline Bosire

    Research output: ThesisPhD Thesis - Research UT, graduation UT

    145 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Food consumption and production are increasingly becoming delinked due to enhanced agricultural productivity that has generated production surpluses in production areas and the globalization of trade. The environmental impact of food consumption is thus increasingly indirect, i.e. not immediately in the same place as in which the consumption takes place. Another development is the increasing fraction of animal source foods in the diet of people, adding to the indirect environmental impacts of consumption because the environmental footprint of animal products is generally larger than the footprint of the crop products they replace. This is particularly relevant in developing countries where the consumption of meat and milk is growing more rapid than in developed countries. The objective of this thesis is to explore the historic, current and future consumption and production patterns of meat and milk in Kenya and link this to an assessment of the associated water and land footprints. The research has been set-up in four subsequent studies. The first study assesses the historical trend in the water and land footprints of meat and milk production in Kenya. The second study explores the potential to meet the projected increase in demand for livestock products within the environmental boundaries. In the third study we assess the historical trends in the water footprint of meat and milk consumption in Nairobi, a rapidly growing megacity. In the fourth study we assess the future water and land footprints within a food self-sufficiency perspective. Below is a summary of the main findings of the study.
    Original languageEnglish
    Awarding Institution
    • University of Twente
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • Hoekstra, Arjen Y., Supervisor
    • Krol, Martinus S., Advisor
    • Hoekstra, A.Y., Supervisor
    • Krol, M.S, Advisor
    Award date8 Dec 2016
    Place of PublicationEnschede
    Publisher
    Print ISBNs978-90-365-4246-3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 8 Dec 2016

    Fingerprint

    milk consumption
    meat production
    food security
    Kenya
    milk production
    meat consumption
    food consumption
    environmental impact
    water footprint
    ecological footprint
    animal-based foods
    globalization
    water
    animal products
    surpluses
    food production
    developed countries
    developing countries
    livestock
    meat

    Keywords

    • METIS-319031
    • IR-102232

    Cite this

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    title = "The water and land footprints of meat and milk production and consumption in Kenya: implications for sustainability and food security",
    abstract = "Food consumption and production are increasingly becoming delinked due to enhanced agricultural productivity that has generated production surpluses in production areas and the globalization of trade. The environmental impact of food consumption is thus increasingly indirect, i.e. not immediately in the same place as in which the consumption takes place. Another development is the increasing fraction of animal source foods in the diet of people, adding to the indirect environmental impacts of consumption because the environmental footprint of animal products is generally larger than the footprint of the crop products they replace. This is particularly relevant in developing countries where the consumption of meat and milk is growing more rapid than in developed countries. The objective of this thesis is to explore the historic, current and future consumption and production patterns of meat and milk in Kenya and link this to an assessment of the associated water and land footprints. The research has been set-up in four subsequent studies. The first study assesses the historical trend in the water and land footprints of meat and milk production in Kenya. The second study explores the potential to meet the projected increase in demand for livestock products within the environmental boundaries. In the third study we assess the historical trends in the water footprint of meat and milk consumption in Nairobi, a rapidly growing megacity. In the fourth study we assess the future water and land footprints within a food self-sufficiency perspective. Below is a summary of the main findings of the study.",
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    The water and land footprints of meat and milk production and consumption in Kenya: implications for sustainability and food security. / Bosire, Caroline.

    Enschede : Universiteit Twente, 2016. 131 p.

    Research output: ThesisPhD Thesis - Research UT, graduation UT

    TY - THES

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    AU - Bosire, Caroline

    PY - 2016/12/8

    Y1 - 2016/12/8

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    AB - Food consumption and production are increasingly becoming delinked due to enhanced agricultural productivity that has generated production surpluses in production areas and the globalization of trade. The environmental impact of food consumption is thus increasingly indirect, i.e. not immediately in the same place as in which the consumption takes place. Another development is the increasing fraction of animal source foods in the diet of people, adding to the indirect environmental impacts of consumption because the environmental footprint of animal products is generally larger than the footprint of the crop products they replace. This is particularly relevant in developing countries where the consumption of meat and milk is growing more rapid than in developed countries. The objective of this thesis is to explore the historic, current and future consumption and production patterns of meat and milk in Kenya and link this to an assessment of the associated water and land footprints. The research has been set-up in four subsequent studies. The first study assesses the historical trend in the water and land footprints of meat and milk production in Kenya. The second study explores the potential to meet the projected increase in demand for livestock products within the environmental boundaries. In the third study we assess the historical trends in the water footprint of meat and milk consumption in Nairobi, a rapidly growing megacity. In the fourth study we assess the future water and land footprints within a food self-sufficiency perspective. Below is a summary of the main findings of the study.

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