Tweeting and tornadoes

J.I. Blanford, Jase Bernhardt, Alexander Savelyev, Gabrielle Wong-Parodi, Andrew M. Carleton, David W. Titley, Alan M. MacEachren

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social Media and micro-blogging is being used during crisis events to provide live up-to-date information as events evolve (before, during and after). Messages are posted by citizens or public officials. To understand the effectiveness of these messages, we examined the content of geo-located Twitter messages ("tweets") sent during the Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20th, 2013 (+/-1day) to explore the spatial and temporal relationships of real-time reactions of the general public. We found a clear transition of topics during each stage of the tornado event. Twitter was useful for posting and retrieving updates, reconstructing the sequence of events as well as capturing people's reactions leading up to, during and after the tornado. A long-term goal for the research reported here is to provide insights to forecasters and emergency response personnel concerning the impact of warnings and other advisory messages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages319-323
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - May 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM 2014 - University Park, PA, United States
Duration: 1 May 20141 May 2014

Conference

Conference11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM 2014
CountryUnited States
CityUniversity Park, PA
Period1/05/141/05/14

Keywords

  • Emergency response
  • GIS
  • Message warnings and alerts
  • Risk communication
  • Situational awareness
  • Spatial and temporal visualization
  • Tornado
  • Twitter
  • ITC-CV

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