Ultra-wide band (400-1700nm) integrated spectrometer based on arrayed waveguide gratings for spectral tissue sensing

Douwe Geuzebroek*, Albert van Rees, Edwin Klein, Katarzyna Lawniczuk

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Photonic Integrated Circuits (PIC) find increasing use in applications that rely on wavelengths outside of the telecommunication wavelength bands where they originate from. Spectroscopy applications in life science and medical generally use wavelengths covering the full visible, near and short-wave infrared region. In this paper we describe the use of photonic integrated circuits as a spectrometer for spectral tissue sensing, which requires to measure the spectral response of a broad band source, emitting light from 400 to 1700nm, scattered from the tip of a photonic needle that is in close contact with tissue [1-4]. The detected spectral fingerprints in the scattered light enables to distinguish between different tissue constituents and tissue types and may serve as real-time feedback to a physician during an intervention. Using photonic integrated circuits supports the desire to lower the size and increase the usability of such equipment, making it more portable and on the long run even implantable.
Original languageEnglish
Pages83-84
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event2017 IEEE 14th International Conference on Group IV Photonics (GFP) - Grand Hyatt Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Duration: 23 Aug 201725 Aug 2017

Conference

Conference2017 IEEE 14th International Conference on Group IV Photonics (GFP)
Abbreviated titleGFP 2017
CountryGermany
CityBerlin
Period23/08/1725/08/17

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