Urban district identity as a common ingroup identity: The different role of ingroup prototypicality for minority and majority groups

Elze Gooitzen Ufkes, S. Otten, K. I. van der Zee, Ellen Giebels, J.F. Dovidio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

In this paper, we examined how identification with urban districts as a common ingroup identity and perceived ingroup prototypicality influence the attitudes of residents toward other ethnic groups in their neighborhood. The overall conclusion of two field studies (N = 214 and N = 98) is that for majority-group members, there may be a positive relation between identification with an overarching identity and outgroup attitudes but only when they perceive their ingroup as low in prototypicality for the overarching group (Study 1 and 2). Conversely, for minority-group members, there may be a positive relation between identification and outgroup attitudes but only when they perceive their ingroup as high in prototypicality for the overarching group (Study 2). Outgroup prototypicality did not moderate the relation between identification and outgroup attitudes
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)706-716
JournalEuropean journal of social psychology
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • METIS-291025
  • IR-82637

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