Use and perceived relevance of health-related Internet sites and online contact with peers among young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Philomine A. van Pelt, Constance H.C. Drossaert, Aike A. Kruize, Jaap Huisman, Radboud J.E.M. Dolhain, Nico M. Wulffraat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of use and relevance of health-related Internet (HRI) sites and online peer support groups and their association with demographic, disease-related and psychosocial variables in young people with JIA.
METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 176 young people (10-27 years of age) with JIA were asked to complete a questionnaire. The frequency of using HRI sites (regarding information, medication use and aspects of JIA relating to social life), online peer contact and perceived relevance of HRI sites and online peer communication were determined. Associations with demographic variables, disease activity, medication, emotional behaviour and coping were also examined.
RESULTS: Seventy-one per cent of the 142 respondents had used the Internet to search for general information on JIA, but specific topics, such as medication, were searched for less often. Twenty-five per cent of respondents had visited a forum or had contacted peers online. The perceived relevance of HRI sites and online peer contact was rated low (median 2.0 and 1.0, respectively; scale 0-10). Apart from female gender (P < 0.01), none of the demographic and disease-related factors were associated with HRI site use. Coping styles, confrontation and reassuring thoughts were associated with increased HRI site use, but only in males. Internalizing and externalizing problem behaviour were not significantly associated.
CONCLUSION: The frequency of HRI site use among young people with JIA was less than expected and was considered of low relevance. HRI sites in their present form cannot replace traditional information as an additional source to increase knowledge.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1833-1841
Number of pages9
JournalRheumatology
Volume54
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Juvenile Arthritis
Internet
Health
Demography
Peer Group
Self-Help Groups
Psychological Adaptation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Communication

Keywords

  • Adolescent rheumatology
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis
  • Transition
  • Digital information
  • Coping factors
  • Education (patients)
  • DMARDs

Cite this

van Pelt, Philomine A. ; Drossaert, Constance H.C. ; Kruize, Aike A. ; Huisman, Jaap ; Dolhain, Radboud J.E.M. ; Wulffraat, Nico M. / Use and perceived relevance of health-related Internet sites and online contact with peers among young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. In: Rheumatology. 2015 ; Vol. 54, No. 10. pp. 1833-1841.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of use and relevance of health-related Internet (HRI) sites and online peer support groups and their association with demographic, disease-related and psychosocial variables in young people with JIA.METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 176 young people (10-27 years of age) with JIA were asked to complete a questionnaire. The frequency of using HRI sites (regarding information, medication use and aspects of JIA relating to social life), online peer contact and perceived relevance of HRI sites and online peer communication were determined. Associations with demographic variables, disease activity, medication, emotional behaviour and coping were also examined.RESULTS: Seventy-one per cent of the 142 respondents had used the Internet to search for general information on JIA, but specific topics, such as medication, were searched for less often. Twenty-five per cent of respondents had visited a forum or had contacted peers online. The perceived relevance of HRI sites and online peer contact was rated low (median 2.0 and 1.0, respectively; scale 0-10). Apart from female gender (P < 0.01), none of the demographic and disease-related factors were associated with HRI site use. Coping styles, confrontation and reassuring thoughts were associated with increased HRI site use, but only in males. Internalizing and externalizing problem behaviour were not significantly associated.CONCLUSION: The frequency of HRI site use among young people with JIA was less than expected and was considered of low relevance. HRI sites in their present form cannot replace traditional information as an additional source to increase knowledge.",
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Use and perceived relevance of health-related Internet sites and online contact with peers among young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. / van Pelt, Philomine A.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Kruize, Aike A.; Huisman, Jaap; Dolhain, Radboud J.E.M.; Wulffraat, Nico M.

In: Rheumatology, Vol. 54, No. 10, 2015, p. 1833-1841.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use and perceived relevance of health-related Internet sites and online contact with peers among young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

AU - van Pelt, Philomine A.

AU - Drossaert, Constance H.C.

AU - Kruize, Aike A.

AU - Huisman, Jaap

AU - Dolhain, Radboud J.E.M.

AU - Wulffraat, Nico M.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of use and relevance of health-related Internet (HRI) sites and online peer support groups and their association with demographic, disease-related and psychosocial variables in young people with JIA.METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 176 young people (10-27 years of age) with JIA were asked to complete a questionnaire. The frequency of using HRI sites (regarding information, medication use and aspects of JIA relating to social life), online peer contact and perceived relevance of HRI sites and online peer communication were determined. Associations with demographic variables, disease activity, medication, emotional behaviour and coping were also examined.RESULTS: Seventy-one per cent of the 142 respondents had used the Internet to search for general information on JIA, but specific topics, such as medication, were searched for less often. Twenty-five per cent of respondents had visited a forum or had contacted peers online. The perceived relevance of HRI sites and online peer contact was rated low (median 2.0 and 1.0, respectively; scale 0-10). Apart from female gender (P < 0.01), none of the demographic and disease-related factors were associated with HRI site use. Coping styles, confrontation and reassuring thoughts were associated with increased HRI site use, but only in males. Internalizing and externalizing problem behaviour were not significantly associated.CONCLUSION: The frequency of HRI site use among young people with JIA was less than expected and was considered of low relevance. HRI sites in their present form cannot replace traditional information as an additional source to increase knowledge.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of use and relevance of health-related Internet (HRI) sites and online peer support groups and their association with demographic, disease-related and psychosocial variables in young people with JIA.METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 176 young people (10-27 years of age) with JIA were asked to complete a questionnaire. The frequency of using HRI sites (regarding information, medication use and aspects of JIA relating to social life), online peer contact and perceived relevance of HRI sites and online peer communication were determined. Associations with demographic variables, disease activity, medication, emotional behaviour and coping were also examined.RESULTS: Seventy-one per cent of the 142 respondents had used the Internet to search for general information on JIA, but specific topics, such as medication, were searched for less often. Twenty-five per cent of respondents had visited a forum or had contacted peers online. The perceived relevance of HRI sites and online peer contact was rated low (median 2.0 and 1.0, respectively; scale 0-10). Apart from female gender (P < 0.01), none of the demographic and disease-related factors were associated with HRI site use. Coping styles, confrontation and reassuring thoughts were associated with increased HRI site use, but only in males. Internalizing and externalizing problem behaviour were not significantly associated.CONCLUSION: The frequency of HRI site use among young people with JIA was less than expected and was considered of low relevance. HRI sites in their present form cannot replace traditional information as an additional source to increase knowledge.

KW - Adolescent rheumatology

KW - Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

KW - Transition

KW - Digital information

KW - Coping factors

KW - Education (patients)

KW - DMARDs

U2 - 10.1093/rheumatology/kev193

DO - 10.1093/rheumatology/kev193

M3 - Article

VL - 54

SP - 1833

EP - 1841

JO - Rheumatology

JF - Rheumatology

SN - 1462-0324

IS - 10

ER -