Using a knowledge elicitation method to specify the business model of a human factors organization.

Jan Maarten Schraagen, Josine van de Ven, Robert R. Hoffman, Brian M. Moon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Concept Mapping was used to structure knowledge elicitation interviews with a group of human factors specialists whose goal was to describe the business model of their Department. This novel use of cognitive task analysis to describe the business model of a human factors organization resulted in a number of Concept Maps on topics such as Department strengths and weaknesses, strategic plans and partnerships, and ambitions and goals. This work might be seen as a prototype for how other human factors organizations might brainstorm their activities, progress, and goals.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Place of PublicationSanta Monica, CA
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Number of pages5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Oct 2009
Event53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009 - San Antonio, United States
Duration: 19 Oct 200923 Oct 2009
Conference number: 53

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society ... annual meeting
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2009
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio
Period19/10/0923/10/09

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