Using social media for collaborative species identification and occurrence: Issues, methods, and tools

Dong Po Deng, Tyng Ruey Chuang, Kwang Tsao Shao, Guan Shuo Mai, Te En Lin, Rob Lemmens, Cheng Hsin Hsu, Hsu Hong Lin, Menno Jan Kraak

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The emergence of social media enables people to interact with others on the web in ways that are media-rich ("updates" or "posts" can be text, photo, audio, video, etc), time-shifted (correspondence need not happen at once or within a pre-defined time frame), and social in nature. By utilizing social media, citizen science projects can potentially engage many participants to contribute their observations covering a large geographic region and over a long time period. This is an improvement, for example, over traditional biodiversity surveys which typically involve relatively few people in confined regions and periods. As social media is not designed for scientific data collection and analysis, there is a problem in transferring unstructured information items (e.g. free-form text, unidentified images, etc.) often found in social media to structured data records for scientific tasks. To help bridge this gap, we propose an approach comprised of three steps: (1) Information Extraction, (2) Information Formalization, and (3) Information Reuse. We apply this approach to processing posts and comments from two Facebook interest groups on species observations. Our study demonstrates that with principled methods and proper tools, crowdsourced social media contents such as those from Facebook interest groups can be used for collaborative species identification and occurrence.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGEOCROWD 2012 - Proceedings of the 1st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Crowdsourced and Volunteered Geographic Information
Pages22-29
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2012
Event1st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Crowdsourced and Volunteered Geographic Information 2012 - Redondo Beach, United States
Duration: 6 Nov 20126 Nov 2012
Conference number: 1
http://www.geocrowd.eu/workshop_2012/

Conference

Conference1st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Crowdsourced and Volunteered Geographic Information 2012
Abbreviated titleGEOCROWD 2012
CountryUnited States
CityRedondo Beach
Period6/11/126/11/12
Internet address

Fingerprint

Biodiversity
social media
Processing
facebook
interest group
formalization
biodiversity
data analysis
video
method
citizen
science
time

Keywords

  • citizen science
  • Facebook
  • linking open data
  • social media
  • volunteered geographic information

Cite this

Deng, D. P., Chuang, T. R., Shao, K. T., Mai, G. S., Lin, T. E., Lemmens, R., ... Kraak, M. J. (2012). Using social media for collaborative species identification and occurrence: Issues, methods, and tools. In GEOCROWD 2012 - Proceedings of the 1st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Crowdsourced and Volunteered Geographic Information (pp. 22-29) https://doi.org/10.1145/2442952.2442957
Deng, Dong Po ; Chuang, Tyng Ruey ; Shao, Kwang Tsao ; Mai, Guan Shuo ; Lin, Te En ; Lemmens, Rob ; Hsu, Cheng Hsin ; Lin, Hsu Hong ; Kraak, Menno Jan. / Using social media for collaborative species identification and occurrence : Issues, methods, and tools. GEOCROWD 2012 - Proceedings of the 1st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Crowdsourced and Volunteered Geographic Information. 2012. pp. 22-29
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Deng, DP, Chuang, TR, Shao, KT, Mai, GS, Lin, TE, Lemmens, R, Hsu, CH, Lin, HH & Kraak, MJ 2012, Using social media for collaborative species identification and occurrence: Issues, methods, and tools. in GEOCROWD 2012 - Proceedings of the 1st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Crowdsourced and Volunteered Geographic Information. pp. 22-29, 1st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Crowdsourced and Volunteered Geographic Information 2012, Redondo Beach, United States, 6/11/12. https://doi.org/10.1145/2442952.2442957

Using social media for collaborative species identification and occurrence : Issues, methods, and tools. / Deng, Dong Po; Chuang, Tyng Ruey; Shao, Kwang Tsao; Mai, Guan Shuo; Lin, Te En; Lemmens, Rob; Hsu, Cheng Hsin; Lin, Hsu Hong; Kraak, Menno Jan.

GEOCROWD 2012 - Proceedings of the 1st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Crowdsourced and Volunteered Geographic Information. 2012. p. 22-29.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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Deng DP, Chuang TR, Shao KT, Mai GS, Lin TE, Lemmens R et al. Using social media for collaborative species identification and occurrence: Issues, methods, and tools. In GEOCROWD 2012 - Proceedings of the 1st ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Crowdsourced and Volunteered Geographic Information. 2012. p. 22-29 https://doi.org/10.1145/2442952.2442957