Wearable physiological sensors reflect mental stress state in office-like situations

J.L.P Wijsman, Bernard Grundlehner, Hao Liu, Julien Penders, Hermanus J. Hermens

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    29 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Timely mental stress detection can help to prevent stress-related health problems. The aim of this study was to identify those physiological signals and features suitable for detecting mental stress in office-like situations. Electrocardiogram (ECG), respiration, skin conductance and surface electromyogram (sEMG) of the upper trapezius muscle were measured with a wearable system during three distinctive stress tests. The protocol contained stress tests that were designed to represent office-like situations. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to classify the data into rest and stress conditions. We reached an average classification rate of 74.5%. This approach may be used for continuous stress measurement in daily office life to detect mental stress at an early stage.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication2013 Humaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction
    Place of PublicationUSA
    PublisherIEEE Computer Society
    Pages600-605
    Number of pages6
    ISBN (Print)978-0-7695-5048-0
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013
    Event5th Humaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ACII 2013 - Geneva, Switzerland
    Duration: 2 Sep 20135 Sep 2013
    Conference number: 5

    Conference

    Conference5th Humaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ACII 2013
    Abbreviated titleACII
    CountrySwitzerland
    CityGeneva
    Period2/09/135/09/13

    Keywords

    • EWI-23666
    • IR-88646
    • METIS-302535

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  • Cite this

    Wijsman, J. L. P., Grundlehner, B., Liu, H., Penders, J., & Hermens, H. J. (2013). Wearable physiological sensors reflect mental stress state in office-like situations. In 2013 Humaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (pp. 600-605). USA: IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACII.2013.105