What is in an index? Construction method, data metric, and weighting scheme determine the outcome of composite social vulnerability indices in New York City

Diana Reckien (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
51 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Mapping social vulnerability is a prominent way to identify regions in which the lack of capacity to cope with the impacts of weather extremes is nested in the social setting, aiding climate change adaptation for vulnerable residents, neighborhoods, or localities. Calculating social vulnerability usually involves the construction of a composite index, for which several construction methods have been suggested. However, thorough investigation of results across methods or applied weighting of vulnerability factors is largely missing. This study investigates the outcome of the variable addition—both with and without weighting of single vulnerability factors—and the variable reduction approach/model on social vulnerability indices calculated for New York City. Weighting is based on scientific assessment reports on climate change impacts in New York City. Additionally, the study calculates the outcome on social vulnerability when using either area-based (person/km2) or population-based (%) input data. The study reveals remarkable differences between indices particularly when using different methods but also when using different metrics as input data. The variable addition model has deductive advantages, whereas the variable reduction model is useful when the strength of factors of social vulnerability is unknown. The use of area-based data seems preferable to population-based data when differences are taken as a measure of credibility and quality. Results are important for all forms of vulnerability mapping using index construction techniques.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberWOS:000432987600017
Pages (from-to)1439-1451
Number of pages13
JournalRegional environmental change
Volume18
Issue number5
Early online date18 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

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construction method
vulnerability
city
index
weather
climate change

Keywords

  • ITC-ISI-JOURNAL-ARTICLE
  • ITC-HYBRID
  • UT-Hybrid-D

Cite this

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What is in an index? Construction method, data metric, and weighting scheme determine the outcome of composite social vulnerability indices in New York City. / Reckien, Diana (Corresponding Author).

In: Regional environmental change, Vol. 18, No. 5, WOS:000432987600017, 01.06.2018, p. 1439-1451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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