When outcome expectations become habitual: explaining vs. predicting new media technology use from a social cognitive perspective

O. Peters

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Abstract

This study examined the triadic relationship between expected outcomes, habit strength, and media technology use within the model of media attendance (Larose & Eastin, 2004). Mobile phone users (N = 664) were divided into two groups using a stratified random sampling method. Respondents of group one (n = 334) were surveyed on existing mobile phone use, respondents of group two (n = 310) were surveyed on the intention to use mobile video phone. On the basis of structural equation analysis, the results of this study support the assumption that within the model of media attendance existing media use is more likely to be explained by habit strength, and new media use is more likely to be predicted by outcome expectations.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages31
Publication statusPublished - 24 May 2007
Event57th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, ICA 2007: Creating Communication: Content, Control, & Critique - San Francisco, CA, San Francisco, United States
Duration: 24 May 200728 May 2007
Conference number: 57

Conference

Conference57th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, ICA 2007
Abbreviated titleICA
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period24/05/0728/05/07
OtherMay 24-28, 2007

Keywords

  • METIS-243885
  • IR-59773

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    Peters, O. (2007). When outcome expectations become habitual: explaining vs. predicting new media technology use from a social cognitive perspective. Paper presented at 57th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, ICA 2007, San Francisco, United States.