When winning is losing: A randomized controlled trial testing a video game to train food-specific inhibitory control

Anouk Poppelaars*, Hanneke Scholten, Isabela Granic, Harm Veling, Mina C. Johnson-Glenberg, Maartje Luijten

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Overweight and obesity are major causes of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A two-armed randomized controlled trial (n = 104) examined the effectiveness of Hit n Run, a video game based on the principles of Go/No-Go inhibition training, in young adults who reported disinhibited eating. Adults (aged 18 to 30) were randomly assigned to play Hit n Run or received an informative brochure (Healthy Eating Step by Step; HESbS). Prior to and directly following the intervention week general and food-specific inhibitory control, caloric intake, and perceived attractiveness of food pictures were assessed. Results revealed no improvements in food-specific inhibitory control or caloric intake in either intervention group. Similar improvements for general inhibitory control and similar decreases in perceived attractiveness of food-related stimuli were observed for both Hit n Run and HESbS. Future research should aim to clarify how video game design can implement working mechanisms of cognitive training tasks to facilitate the development of effective game-based interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-154
JournalAppetite
Volume129
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018
Externally publishedYes

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